resistant starch


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re·sis·tant starch

(rĕ-zis'tănt stahrch)
Dietary starch resistant to pancreatic amylase, allowing it to escape into the large bowel, where it is fermented to short-chain fatty acids by colonic microflora.
References in periodicals archive ?
National Starch already is experiencing success with its Hi-maize resistant starch from corn, which can replace about 25 percent of flour in bakery formulations.
In reviewing Ingredion's petition, the FDA concluded there was scientific evidence for a qualified health claim for high-amylose maize resistant starch and reduced risk of Type 2 diabetes, while ensuring the claim was appropriately worded so as not to be misleading: "High-amylose maize resistant starch may reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes.
Resistant starch is a starch that lacks enough of the right enzymes for you to completely digest the food.
Hi-maize resistant starch offers food manufacturers opportunities in a wide range of formulations, including pasta, pizza, cereal bars, breads and snacks.
"Resistant starch, although chemically not a fiber, acts like a functional dietary fiber in the gastrointestinal tracts and allows for the advantages of fiber to a food without changing taste, texture or convenience," explains Rhonda Witwer, business development manager of nutrition for National Starch.
WEIGHTAIN is made from a proprietary high-amylose resistant starch, whole grain, hydrocolloid and unique composite technology.
Maria Louise Marco, PhD, University of California, Davis: Marco s research, The mechanisms of resistant starch and lactobacillus effects on the intestinal microbiota and protection against obesity and insulin resistance, will investigate how two common food ingredients, fermentable carbohydrates (resistant starch) and lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacilllus), may improve health through alteration of the bacterial diversity and metabolic profiles of the intestinal microbiota.
They are foods high in something called resistant starch.
Resistant starch, a type of dietary fiber, can be incorporated into wheat flour tortillas to improve their dietary fiber content without causing any adverse effects on consumer acceptability.