resistance exercise


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resistance exercise

Exercise in which a muscle contraction is opposed by force to increase strength or endurance. If the resistance is applied by using weights, it is mechanical resistance; if applied by a clinician, it is manual resistance.
Synonym: resistive exercise
See also: exercise
References in periodicals archive ?
It is believed that during extreme Eccentric Resistance Exercise, high mechanical tension is the primary incentive for activation of the satellite cells and the subsequent hypertrophy of the skeletal muscle; however, it may also result in tissue damages (MacDougall, 1986).
However, currently, there is still shortage of information on cardiovascular and metabolic responses contrasting the CL with different loads (moderate and higher intensities) to train resistance exercise. In a previous study, we quantified the maximal load capacity above the aerobic critical load as a method for estimating anaerobic load capacity (10).
The physical benefits of resistance exercise training (RET) are established, but the antidepressant effect of RET is less clear.
Thus, a gap in this experimente was not to have compared oxygen consumption responses in the resistance exercise session, which is a limitation that the present study sought to correct.
The aim of this study, therefore, was to investigate the influence of resistance exercise in hypoxia on postexercise hemodynamics in healthy young males.
ISLAMABAD -- Performing resistance exercises regularly can help in boosting overall health and lower the risk of developing chronic lifestyle diseases like heart trouble, diabetes and obesity, a study said.
Here are just a few benefits of why you show try to maintain a strong muscular system: | Rebuilding muscle - even a relatively brief programme of resistance exercise eg 20- to 40-minute session, two or three days a week can help rebuild muscle tissue in people aged 50 to 90.
The best documented data on the effects of Pilates for a hospital-based resistance exercise in acutely-ill elderly patients was published on the BMC Geriatrics Journal (Mallery et al., 2003).
Although there are no clear data on the effects of resistance exercise (RE) on AD, only a small number of articles have studied the effects of RE on models of aging.
Resistance exercise training has been hypothesized to reduce multiple health risk factors including those for cardiovascular disease [7].
However, a resistance exercise program can be demanding for participants, because often high intensity resistance exercise is prescribed for old adults [2].
Low volume, high intensity endurance, and resistance exercise protocols may be time-efficient methods to realize this aim [3-5].