resin


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resin

 [rez´in]
1. a solid or semisolid organic substance exuded by plants or by insects feeding on plants, or produced synthetically; they are insoluble in water but mostly soluble in alcohol or ether. adj., adj res´inous.
2. a compound made by condensation or polymerization of low-molecular-weight organic compounds.
acrylic r's products of the polymerization of acrylic or methacrylic acid or their derivatives, used in fabrication of medical prostheses and dental restorations and appliances.
anion exchange resin see ion-exchange resin.
cation exchange resin see ion-exchange resin.
cholestyramine resin a synthetic, strongly basic anion exchange resin in the chloride form which chelates bile salts in the intestine, thus preventing their reabsorption; used as an adjunctive therapy to diet in management of certain hypercholesterolemias and in the symptomatic relief of pruritus associated with bile stasis.
composite resin a synthetic resin, usually acrylic based, to which a high percentage of ceramic reinforcing filler has been added, such as particles of glass or silica coated with a coupling agent to bind them to the matrix; used chiefly in dental restorations. Called also composite.
epoxy resin a tough, chemically resistant, adhesive, flexible, dimensionally stable resin of epoxy polymers; used as denture base material.
ion exchange resin a high-molecular-weight insoluble polymer of simple organic compounds capable of exchanging its attached ions for other ions in the surrounding medium; classified as (a)cation or anion exchange resins, depending on which ions the resin exchanges; and (b) carboxylic, sulfonic, and so on depending on the nature of the active groups.
podophyllum resin a mixture of resins from podophyllum, used as a topical caustic in treatment of laryngeal papillomas, condylomata acuminata, and other epitheliomas.

res·in

(rez'in, rŏz'),
1. An amorphous, brittle substance consisting of the hardened secretion of various plants, probably derived from a volatile oil and similar to a stearoptene.
2. Synonym(s): rosin
3. A precipitate formed by the addition of water to certain tinctures.
4. A broad term used to indicate organic substances (often polymeric) insoluble in water; the monomer's subunits are named according to their chemical composition, physical structure, and means of activation or curing, for example, acrylic resin, autopolymer resin.
[L. resina]

res·in

(rez'in)
1. An amorphous brittle substance consisting of the hardened secretion of a number of plants, probably derived from a volatile oil and similar to a stearoptene.
2. Synonym(s): rosin.
3. A precipitate formed by the addition of water to certain tinctures.
4. A broad term used to indicate organic substances insoluble in water.
[L. resina]

resin

  1. any of a mixed group of compounds, including resin ACIDS, ESTERS and TERPENES that are found notably in plants, particularly trees and shrubs. Resins are often exuded from wounds, following injury or the infection of plants by, for example, FUNGI.
  2. a polymerized support used in, for example, CHROMATOGRAPHY.

res·in

(rez'in)
1. An amorphous, brittle substance consisting of hardened secretion of various plants, probably derived from a volatile oil and similar to a stearoptene.
2. Broad term for organic substances insoluble in water.
3. A precipitate formed by the addition of water to certain tinctures.
[L. resina]
References in periodicals archive ?
Table II.- Comparison for mean weight loss (%) of kail, poplar and peepal woods following resin application after subjected to different temperatures against O.
Type of resins: Epoxy hardeners; epoxy resins; high-solid resins; hybrid resins; polyamide
The low degree of condensation and precipitation of monomeric species controls the storage stability of the MF resin. Storage temperature may be adjusted to 50[degrees]C for a longer shelf life after resin manufacture (Jahromi 1999, Jahromi et al.
Heritage Plastics used to make 80% CaCO3 concentrates with wide-spec LLDPE as the carrier resin. But two years ago it switched to prime virgin resin because consistent flow properties are essential with filler loadings over 10% to 12%.
Fifth generation resin systems include total etch, as performed in 4th generation.
Resins are said to be designed for processing, not purging, according to the manufacturer of Dyna-Purge products.
Due to the combined effect of expansion and contraction of sand and resin binders at temperatures up to 300C (572F), there were no significant changes in the specimens' volumes.
We analyzed three commercial Bis-GMA monomers and six Bis-GMA-based composite resins including Z-100, Charisma, and Tetric under the following HPLC conditions: we used a C18 column (flow of 1 mL/min) with acetonitrile/water (50/50) as the solvent, a temperature of 40 [degrees] C, a duration of 55 min (isocratic mode), UV detection (at 230 nm), and fluorescence (excitation 275 nm; emission 300 nm) (5).
Resin producers such as GE Plastics are deeply involved in finding better ways to help customers address environmental trends.
This refers to the type of chemistry used in all light-cured resins. BisGMA-based resins include the bonding adhesive and the filled composites you use in your practice every day for performing all bonded restorations, sealants or direct veneers.
Made by BASF, this instrument counts the particles of dispersed pitch, or suspended wood resin, in pulps and white waters by measuring the fluorescent intensities of dyed resin particles as they pass through a laser beam in a tiny stream.