resident


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res·i·dent

(rez'i-dĕnt),
A house officer attached to a hospital for clinical training; formerly, one who actually resided in the hospital.
Synonym(s): resident physician
[L. resideo, to reside]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

resident

(rĕz′ĭ-dənt, -dĕnt′)
n.
1. A physician receiving specialized clinical training in a hospital, usually after completing an internship.
2. A nonmigratory bird or other animal.
adj.
1. Dwelling in a particular place; residing: resident aliens.
2. Nonmigratory: resident fauna.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

resident

Registrar A physician who has completed medical school and internship, and is receiving training in a specialty. See Residency.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

res·i·dent

(rez'i-dĕnt)
1. A house officer attached to a hospital for clinical training.
2. A patient residing in a health care facility.
[L. resideo, to reside]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

res·i·dent

(rez'i-dĕnt)
A house officer attached to a hospital for clinical training.
Synonym(s): resident physician.
[L. resideo, to reside]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Common exceptions include the following: * A facility used solely for the purpose of storage, display or delivery of goods or merchandise belonging to the resident. This would cover, for example, a U.S.
(1) Although all four are key principles, especially as they relate to counseling residents and families regarding end-of-life issues, possibly most important is autonomy.
Perhaps firms that offer Minimum Data Set (MDS) software can add a section with questions aimed at revealing each resident's level of satisfaction and personal quality-of-life priorities.
citizens and residents, while Canada's income tax is based only on residence.
New prospects visiting communities that offer extensive AlL services in their IL units increasingly judge all residents there as "older, frailer people." Many prospects and their families tend to make move decisions based on their observations of the existing resident population.
One of the residents colonized with GAS (resident A) was a 69-year-old woman, immobilized by severe neurologic disease, who had a suprapubic bladder catheter and a gastrostomy tube.
Finally, a post-payment review by tax department personnel may be impractical, especially where there are a large number of payments to residents or non-residents that are not subject to withholding tax.
A HUD document entitled "General Guidance on community and Resident Involvement" states that a consultative group should be formed at each development comprising "all [relocated] residents who wish to return." Such a group, which is not required by law, would deal with the authority on all redevelopment matters.
Under this test, an individual is deemed a resident on the first day during the calendar year on which he or she is present in the United States.
Meanwhile, hospitals have an enormous financial incentive to push residents as hard as they can, because, as one resident told me, "we're cheap as hell." Although they make more than they did 50 years ago, residents are still paid close to minimum wage for the hours they work.
One resident, while learning to manage his money and a new checking account, had endeared himself to the banking staff in such a way that they did not bother to check his account when he withdrew money.
Having lived in the same place for over thirty years, these residents have no wish to move, even though the vast majority of them are elderly and need special care and services.

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