resectable


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Related to resectable: Resectable cancer

re·sect·a·ble

(rē-sek'tă-bĕl),
Amenable to resection.

resectable

adjective Referring to a tumour that can be managed in part or completely by surgical resection.

re·sect·a·ble

(rē-sek'tă-bĕl)
Amenable to resection.

resectable

(rē-sĕk′tă-bl)
Able to be removed surgically; usually used in reference to malignant growths.
References in periodicals archive ?
Survival after neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for resectable oesophageal carcinoma: An updated meta-analysis.
Perioperative chemotherapy versus surgery alone for resectable gastroesophageal cancer.
2] disease, previously untreated cases, age between 20 and 80 years, no distant metastasis, normal renal and hepatic functions, patients ready for written informed consent for above study, and resectable tumors.
01), as well as borderline resectable or yet-undetermined disease stage (25.
It has been shown that preoperative chemoradiotherapy is associated with reduced local recurrence rate and it is considered as the standard of care for moderate or high-risk resectable rectal cancer [7, 8].
According to our results one-stage hepatectomy is recommended for patients with preserved liver function (ChildPugh classes A and B) and resectable tumors.
Neoadjuvant therapy prior to pneumonectomy converts many non-resectable tumors to a resectable stage and subsequently offers long-term survival benefits, and in our experience, it did not significantly increase the postoperative mortality.
Should the lesion initially be resectable, based on imaging, primary surgical excision to ensure decreased tumour burden before chemotherapy achieves optimal results.
This novel diagnostic approach, which is safe and easy to apply as a screening method, is expected to improve the prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer by detecting their cancers early, when still in a resectable and curable state," he said.
The early stages of PC are usually asymptomatic, and the aggressive nature of this disease, in combination with our limited capability for early detection, contribute to the very low percentage of patients (approximately 20%) diagnosed with resectable disease.