rescue

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rescue

Emergency medicine Any activity that brings a victim of disaster or accident to safety. Cf Disaster Oncology Rescue therapy. See Leucovorin rescue, Marker rescue.

RESCUE

Cardiology A clinical trial–Randomized Evaluation of Salvage Angioplasty with Combined Utilization of Endpoints that compared the effects of rescue coronary angioplasty with conservative therapy of occluded infarct-related arteries. See Coronary angioplasty, Rescue adjunctive coronary angioplasty.

res·cue

(res'kyū)
1. To save from harm, in a clinical or therapeutic sense.
2. Describing an analgesic prescribed for breakthrough pain (e.g., opioids for cancer therapy).
[M.E. rescouen]

rescue

(res′kū″)
1. To free a person from a hazardous situation such as entrapment in an automobile, trench, cave, or burning building, or from the site of a hazardous material spill.
2. To restore an organ to its normal function after an illness or a treatment that has damaged it.

abdominal rescue

Emergency cesarean delivery of a fetus jeopardized during labor or failed vaginal birth. Indications for surgical intervention include fetal distress associated with dystocia, arrested descent, abruptio placentae, or umbilical cord prolapse.

stem cell rescue

In patients being treated with high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, the removal of stem cells (the precursors to red and white blood cells and platelets) from the patient's blood before treatment and their reinfusion after treatment. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor, erythropoietin, and other growth factors are administered to stimulate proliferation of the stem cells after reinfusion. Until adequate numbers of cells repopulate the patient's marrow and bloodstream, the patient is at high risk for infection and bleeding.

Stem cell rescue is used in patients with solid tumors not involving bone marrow who require treatments that would destroy the blood-forming (hematopoietic) cells. The process is immunologically advantageous because the cells infused are the patient's own cells, and thus do not have foreign antigens.

References in periodicals archive ?
They might, more contentiously, argue that if we deny any chance of rescue for those in the smaller group on grounds of simple summing of rescuable lives, then we fail to accord due respect for the value of individual persons; we illegitimately treat them merely as fungible placeholders for utility.
Amicus was founded to capitalize on the discovery that many diseases of genetic origin are caused by missense mutations and other rescuable mutations that result in the misfolding of a protein or enzyme.
whose impact is not negligible: notions such as disaster, nihilism, "crude economic realism," our being beyond "enchantment," a lyricism rescuable only via disillusion, et cetera.