res ipsa loquitur


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Latin for ‘the thing speaks for itself.’ A legal doctrine under which a plaintiff’s burden to prove a defendant’s negligence is minimal and may not require expert witnesses as the details of the incident are clear and understandable to a jury—e.g., foreign objects, gauze, surgical instruments, left in the patient during surgery

res ipsa loquitur

The thing speaks for itself Law & medicine A legal doctrine under which a plaintiff's burden to prove negligence is minimal as the details of the incident are clear and understandable to a jury–eg, foreign objects left behind during surgery, eg towels. See Medical malpractice.

res ip·sa lo·qui·tur

(res ip'să lō'kwi-tŭr)
The thing speaks for itself; the circumstantial evidence (of malpractice) is obvious and does not require an expert witness to testify.
[L.]

res ip·sa lo·qui·tur

(res ip'să lō'kwi-tŭr)
Latin meaning the thing speaks for itself.
[L.]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the particular case, the Court decided that the owner did not prove the reason why the branch of the tree fell on his property, the principle of res ipsa loquitur could not be applied and the onus of proof remained upon the shoulders of the owner.
serves no lawful purpose of the actor under the circumstances." (65) Unlike the probable desistance test, the substantial step test would apply regardless of the probability that a particular defendant would desist; unlike the res ipsa loquitur test, it would not require the defendant's actions to unequivocally indicate criminal intent.
Res Ipsa Loquitur is one of three course-and-distance winners in the ten-runner line-up.
The patient's contention that the suit was for general negligence, not medical malpractice, and that no expert medical testimony was required under the Doctrine of Res Ipsa Loquitur (RIL) was rejected by the trial court, which granted the hospital's motion for summary judgment.
La tendencia del Consejo de Estado a utilizar la prueba indiciaria como la herramienta que permite superar las dificultades probatorias en la responsabilidad medica estatal, genera como cuestionamiento si esto conlleva al abandono de las soluciones que anteriormente la jurisprudencia del Consejo de Estado planteaba a estas dificultades, tales como la inversion de la carga de la prueba, la disminucion del estandar probatorio en la verificacion del nexo de causalidad, o las teorias de la culpa virtual o del res ipsa loquitur o prueba prima facie; e igualmente, se cuestiona si se ha abandonado en materia obstetrica la responsabilidad objetiva como medio de adjudicacion de responsabilidad.
(4) Judge Cardozo's conception of products liability in MacPherson had roots in the doctrine of res ipsa loquitur, (5) and it was under that framework that courts applied the decision for nearly three decades.
Likewise, instruction 402.4 Medical Negligence now covers a variety of different types of negligence, including the presence of foreign bodies, res ipsa loquitur, and the failure of health care providers to maintain records.
Please, please accept an ancient res ipsa loquitur (pompous legal term for "the thing speaks for itself"): the people you contact, not you, decide whether yours is a worthy enterprise.
(94) However, before strict liability in tort could become a major fixture of American law, an expansion of the common-law doctrine of res ipsa loquitur was necessary.
The maxim res ipsa loquitur, which means 'the facts speak for themselves', is being used in other countries for negligence cases, but not in South Africa.
(4) Chief among those rules is the res ipsa loquitur presumption that creates a strong evidential association between safety and conventional precautions against harm.
of Louisville School of Law) provides road maps for each of his major topics, covering negligence (including res ipsa loquitur and failure to use reasonable care), strict liability in tort (including tests for unreasonable danger and proof problems), warranty (including express and implied), misrepresentation, parties, manufacture, design, warnings, causation, defenses, and damages.