reproductive toxicity


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reproductive toxicity

Any adverse effect attributable to exposure to a chemical, directed against the reproductive and/or related endocrine systems Adverse effects Altered sexual behavior, fertility, pregnancy outcomes, or modifications in other functions that depend on reproductive integrity of system. See Teratogenicity.
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The laboratory rat has served as the traditional animal model of choice for research and regulatory developmental and reproductive toxicity testing conducted to support human health hazard identification and risk assessment.
Propolis protection from reproductive toxicity caused by aluminium chloride in male rats.
The therapeutic effect of silybum marianum on the lead acetate induced reproductive toxicity in both gender laboratory rats.
Abdou HM, Newairy AA (2006) Hepatic and Reproductive toxicity of lead in female rats and attenuation by flaxseed lignans.
Some phthalates have been linked to endocrine disruption and developmental and reproductive toxicity so preventing harmful ones ending up in toys and other childcare items is a priority.
Of greatest concern is that parabens are known to disrupt hormone function, an effect that is linked to increased risk of breast cancer and reproductive toxicity," reports the non-profit Campaign for Safe Cosmetics (CSC).
As this species has not previously been used in reproductive toxicity studies with EGb 761[R], the present investigation was conducted to examine the influence of EGb 761[R] (100, 350 and 1225 mg/kg/day) on embryo-fetal development in mice during the critical period of organogenesis.
The scientists hope their integration of drug development and reproductive toxicity testing is the beginning of a new era in which chemotherapy drugs are developed with an eye on their fertotoxity (fertility toxicity).
Directive 2003/15/EC on cosmetic products establishes a phase-out of animal testing as follows: in 2004, the testing ban for finished cosmetics entered into force; March 2009 marked the entry into force of the ban on testing ingredients on animals in Europe and marketing cosmetics manufactured elsewhere containing ingredients tested on animals; a derogation is nonetheless allowed for tests related to complex toxicological effects, such as toxicity from repeated doses, reproductive toxicity and toxicokinetics; as of 11 March 2013, or ten years after the directive's entry into force, the ban became total.
Cosmetics Europe said there was a lack of alternative tests for risks such as genetic mutation or reproductive toxicity, which will make it hard to develop new products.
Later results indicated that both the neurotoxicity and the reproductive toxicity were worse than thought, and most makers reduced their recommended OEL to 25ppm, although one recommended 100ppm.

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