reprocessing

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reprocessing

Preparation of a dialysis membrane (or other medical device) for reuse with rinses and sterilizing solutions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Japan reprocesses spent fuel, instead of disposing it as waste, to extract plutonium and uranium to make MOX fuel for reuse, while the U.S.
That has led the VA to take a closer look at the situation and allow veterans an opportunity to have their TBI claims reprocessed.
Bill Wells, sales and marketing director, label, for Mitsubishi Polyester Films Americas, says, "Spear has demonstrated true industry leadership by supporting the commercialization of our Reprocess closed loop product system.
IEER also reported that France, which runs the world's most efficient reprocessing operation, spends about two cents per kilowatt hour more for electricity generated from reprocessed nuclear fuel compared to that generated from fresh fuel.
As announcements of double-digit increases in resin prices have become almost routine, less-expensive reprocessed resins may appear more tempting to use.
Irradiated fuel was reprocessed by "melt-refining."
The total amount of meat product reworked, reprocessed, cooked, and sold again comes to 1.7 million pounds out of 5.2 million pounds recalled.
Taipower in February issued an online call for bids to solicit overseas contractors to reprocess about 1,200 bundles of spent fuel rods from the Jinshan and Guoshan nuclear power plants in New Taipei City, for which the company has requested a budget of NT$11.25 billion (US$362.9 million).
* Providing a superior way to reprocess heat-sensitive, semi-critical medical devices that are unsuitable for sterilization.
For decades, Japan has upheld a policy to seek to reprocess all spent fuel from nuclear power plants and reuse the extracted plutonium and uranium as reactor fuel.
M2 EQUITYBITES-March 29, 2011--TGS to reprocess Faroe 2D seismic data(C)2011 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
Reprocessing companies, hospital associations and environmental groups counter that the devices they reprocess are as safe as new, cost 40% to 60% less, and can eliminate thousands of tons of waste from landfills.