reprint


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reprint

An individually bound copy of an article in a journal or science communication
References in periodicals archive ?
In some cases I initially identified a story as a reprint--either in whole or in part--based only on the small excerpt of the reprint that was available or visible in a particular database.
The reason why the United States was controlled by reprints was simple: most Americans and various businesses preferred it that way.
ICopyright partners include a reprint tag at the bottom of their articles on the Web.
My organizational skills improved dramatically and my religious formation accelerated as I crawled around on the floor and climbed the shelves to locate reprints.
Selection criteria for reprints of articles used in various chapters are not elucidated.
The biggest publishing companies like McGraw-Hill recognize reprints as a real profit center.
For researchers and information managers, this combined workflow tool will deliver substantial time savings across the research lifecycle: from search to discovery to procurement," says Ian Palmer, Head of Marketing at Reprints Desk.
43) Furthermore, by collecting citations for each reprint, it is possible to supplement the bibliographies of the poet's fiction begun by an earlier generation of Whitman scholars, including those compiled by William White and Thomas Brasher, which I reference frequently in the following pages.
The iCopyright Instant Clearance Service makes it easy for readers to purchase reprints and other reuse rights," said Lavinia Calvert, Reuters Media's executive vice president and publisher.
The Web service will be launched later this year and will allow instant reuse or reprint of content from any registered publisher.
Kane, Drugs That Enslave: The Opium, Morphine, Chloral and Hashisch Habits (Philadelphia, 1881; reprint, New York, 1981), 18, 25; Charles E.
This reprint from 1964 describes the Confederate system of supply in the Trans-Mississippi region during the Civil War and the Quartermaster Department, which was in charge of buying goods.