repression


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repression

 [re-presh´un]
1. the act of restraining, inhibiting, or suppressing.
2. in molecular genetics, inhibition of gene transcription by a repressor.
3. in psychiatry, a defense mechanism by which a person unconsciously banishes unacceptable ideas, feelings or impulses from consciousness. A person using repression to obtain relief from mental conflict is unaware of “forgetting” unpleasant situations as a way of avoiding them. If done to an extreme, repression may lead to increased tension and irresponsible behavior that the person himself cannot understand or explain.
enzyme repression interference, usually by the end product of a pathway, with synthesis of the enzymes of that pathway.

re·pres·sion

(rē-presh'ŭn),
1. In psychotherapy, the active process or defense mechanism of keeping out and ejecting and banishing from consciousness those ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to the ego or superego.
2. Decreased expression of some gene product.
[L. re-primo, pp. -pressus, to press back, repress]

repression

/re·pres·sion/ (-presh´un)
1. the act of restraining, inhibiting, or suppressing.
2. in psychiatry, an unconscious defense mechanism in which unacceptable ideas, fears, and impulses are thrust out or kept out of consciousness.

enzyme repression  interference, usually by the endproduct of a pathway, with synthesis of the enzymes of that pathway.
gene repression  the inhibition of gene transcription of an operon; in prokaryotes repressor binding to the operon is involved.

repression

(rĭ-prĕsh′ən)
n.
Psychology The unconscious exclusion of painful impulses, desires, or fears from the conscious mind.

re·pres′sion·ist adj.

repression

[ripresh′ən]
Etymology: L, reprimere, to press back
1 the act of restraining, inhibiting, or suppressing.
2 (in psychoanalysis) an unconscious defense mechanism that also underlies all defense mechanisms, whereby unacceptable thoughts, feelings, ideas, impulses, or memories, especially those concerning some traumatic past event, are pushed from the consciousness because of their painful guilt association or disagreeable content and are submerged in the unconscious, where they remain dormant but operant. Such repressed emotional conflicts are the source of anxiety that may lead to any of the anxiety disorders. Compare suppression. repress, v., repressive, adj.

repression

Psychiatry An unconscious defense mechanism, that blocks unacceptable ideas, fantasies, or impulses from consciousness or that keeps unconsciousness what never was conscious. Cf Suppression Psychoanalysis A mental block to acknowledging an uncomfortable memory or feeling.

re·pres·sion

(rē-presh'ŭn)
1. psychotherapy The active process or defense mechanism of keeping out and ejecting, banishing from consciousness, ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to it.
2. Decreased expression of some gene product.
[L. re-primo, pp. -pressus, to press back, repress]

repression

1. Inhibition of transcription at a particular site on DNA or MESSENGER RNA by the binding of REPRESSOR PROTEIN to the site.
2. The prevention of the synthesis of certain enzymes by bacterial products.

repression

the state in which a gene is prevented from being transcribed, so that no protein is produced. see OPERON MODEL.

Repression

A unconscious psychological mechanism in which painful or unacceptable ideas, memories, or feelings are removed from conscious awareness or recall.
Mentioned in: Somatoform Disorders

re·pres·sion

(rē-presh'ŭn)
1. In psychotherapy, the active process or defense mechanism of keeping out and ejecting and banishing from consciousness those ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to the ego or superego.
2. Decreased expression of some gene product.
[L. re-primo, pp. -pressus, to press back, repress]

repression

1. the act of restraining, inhibiting or suppressing.
2. in molecular genetics, inhibition of gene transcription by a repressor.

enzyme repression
interference, usually by the end product of a pathway, with synthesis of the enzymes of that pathway.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is the number that expresses the damage the political repression has done to our traditions, way of thinking, memory of the nation and patriotism, noted President Battulga.
Until they realise that democracy is the only solution, Egyptians will continue to live with the syndrome of popular protest and state repression.
What matters is realizing that the so-called "parallel structure," referred to as an element of threat to state security, is being used as justification for arbitrary decisions, repression and pressure in the ongoing process where normal legal and democratic customs are being ignored.
The lawmakers also noted that sexual violence in the context of political repression and waging war is used by both Marcos and Aquino regimes as part of its terror tactics.
The net impact was to increase the financial repression tax on households - a tax which went directly to subsidizing borrowers.
Le texte, presente par le ministre de l'Habitat, de l'urbanisme et de la politique de la ville Nabil Benabdallah, vise a instaurer un traitement preventif, immediat, efficient et integre du phenomene de construction illegale, a raffermir les garanties de protection de l'espace urbain et a depasser les dysfonctionnements entachant le systeme de controle et de repression en vigueur, indique un communique lu par le ministre de la Communication, porte-parole du gouvernement, Mustapha El Khalfi, au terme de cette reunion.
He said France was "more than ever committed to have a resolution adopted" at the UN Security Council in order to "put an end to the repression and implement a political transition in accordance with the aspirations of the Syrian people.
legitimately elected black representatives; the pattern of targeted surveillance and repression of black officials between 1965 and 1975; the emergence of "harassment ideology" in the wake of the Watergate Scandal and its effect on black political thought; Republican attacks on black Democrats by means of targeted federal law enforcement in the 1980s; the disproportionate investigation of black elected officials in Alabama and the role of their resistance in the national struggle against targeted investigation; and the fall of anti-harassment organizing in the 1990s.
Apres leur veto, les forces d'Assad ont intensifie leur repression, particulierement contre la ville de Homs, centre de la resistance syrienne.
Kataeb Deputy saw that Christians of the East must advocate the principles of freedom, justice, and democracy, hoping Christians in Syria would make a historic choice in fighting repression and injustice.
Indeed, currently only persons - natural or legal - and economic entities responsible for or linked to the violent repression against the civilian population in Syria can be targeted.
FOREIGN Secretary William Hague has hailed the extension of more EU sanctions against Syria as a signal of European determination to stop the regime's brutal repression of the people.