repress


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repress

(rĭ-prĕs′)
v. re·pressed, re·pressing, re·presses
v.tr.
1. Psychology To exclude (painful or disturbing memories, for example) automatically or unconsciously from the conscious mind.
2. Biology
a. To prevent (the transcription of a gene or the synthesis of a protein) by the combination of a protein with an operator gene.
b. To prevent or limit the synthesis of (a protein).

re·press′i·bil′i·ty n.
re·press′i·ble adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the ambush interview, Morales denied she was taking a swipe against the President when asked who were the groupstrying to repress the Ombudsman.
Individuals who tend to repress their feelings should be mindful that complaints of discrimination, and the attendant opportunity to mediate a conflict, are subject to regulatory time limits.
They fiercely repress the threat to their sense of manhood posed by racist humiliations beneath an increasingly rigid facade of ideal masculinity.
Stressing that true Christianity aims to redeem sexuality, not repress it, Purity of Heart points the way to redemption of the body through Jesus Christ, warns against "legalized sin" and the slippery slope of ignoring or minimizing the repercussions of adultery, the importance of honoring the body, the task of building a culture of purity, and much more.
Unable to repress her curiosity, Una searches for the source of the light flash and unexpectedly falls into a strange land filled with unusual characters and considerable danger
The first attempt to repress the movies was a humdinger by any standards.
A University of Oregon professor has for the first time identified a mechanism in the human brain that helps people repress memories.
Stephens marvelously teases out the double-bind witchcraft theorists found themselves in: aware that contact with demons was morally wrong, they nevertheless craved contact in order to reassure themselves that demons were real; insisting on the reality of demons, they also had to rigorously repress their own doubts.
Fowler sees in Faulkner's fiction a clear reflection of this cultural need to repress women as mothers.
Further-more, transfection results show that promoters containing one IRF-2 binding site activate tr anscription while those promoters with two IRF-2 binding sites repress transcription.
This included an assortment of measures designed to repress the movement's foreign operations as well as domestic activities.