repress


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repress

(rĭ-prĕs′)
v. re·pressed, re·pressing, re·presses
v.tr.
1. Psychology To exclude (painful or disturbing memories, for example) automatically or unconsciously from the conscious mind.
2. Biology
a. To prevent (the transcription of a gene or the synthesis of a protein) by the combination of a protein with an operator gene.
b. To prevent or limit the synthesis of (a protein).

re·press′i·bil′i·ty n.
re·press′i·ble adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
'It's one of the best things I've worked on.'Stephen plays recovering alcoholic Joseph ' Graham plays recovering alcoholic Joseph, who, after his young son moves to Australia, goes on a massive bender, and then travels to Ireland to find his sister, which triggers repressed memories of abuse.
In the ambush interview, Morales denied she was taking a swipe against the President when asked who were the groupstrying to repress the Ombudsman.
Psychoanalytic therapies are those treatments in which the therapist's job is to help people face what they have repressed and what they don't want to know.
We also see the other end of the spectrum in our office, in "RAPs," or repressed anger professionals.
Horrendous acts of sexual abuse that force the victims to repress
President Barack Obama told Syria on Friday that its bloody crackdown on protesters "must come to an end now" and accused Damascus of seeking Iranian help to repress its people.
Summary: Vienna - "The vision that aims to repress and reduce migration and uses foreigners as scapegoats to attract extremist voters must be strongly denounced", Morocco's permanent representative at international organizations in Vienna, Ambassador Omar Zniber, said at the preliminary evaluation conference to the next OSCE summit, to be held in December in Astana, Kazakhstan.
Perhaps Mojo would better serve its readers by not wasting its pages on fluff pieces about prison guards and their silly convention on how to further repress the most repressed Americans.
The mind does not like terrible things, so it will often repress them.
It could certainly stupefy a soldier, but it's very doubtful it could repress his sexual desire.
In his book, The Last Self-Help Book You'll Ever Need: Repress Your Anger, Think Negatively, Be a Good Blamer, and Throttle Your Inner Child (Basic Books; $14.95), Pearsall suggests that many of the generic, feel-good, pop psychology messages offered on bookshelves actually do readers more harm than good.