reportable death

reportable death

A death which must by British law be reported to the coroner or, in Scotland, to the Procurator Fiscal.

Reportable deaths
• The deceased has not been treated by a doctor during their illness;
• The doctor attending the deceased did not see him or her within 14 days before he or she died, or after death;
• The death occurred during an operation or before recovery from the effect of an anaesthetic;
• The death was sudden and unexplained or by suspicious circumstances;
• The death may be due to an industrial injury or disease, or to accident, violence, neglect or abortion, or to any kind of poisoning;
• The death occurred in police custody or in prison.

If after postmortem examination the death was deemed unnatural, then an inquest will be held.
References in periodicals archive ?
7) Yet despite the emergence of medical-setting deaths as a separate and discrete category of reportable death, not all jurisdictions have followed suit, and those that have made amendments have opted for individualised definitions.
This article examines the current Australian law on the circumstances in which a medical-setting death is reportable to the coroner and the penalties that apply when a reportable death is not reported.
25) The more general (non-situational) categories of reportable death also differ.
43) Importantly, this avoids the need to rely on more general categories of reportable death (eg, 'violent' or 'unnatural' death).
This anaesthetic category of reportable death can also lead to anomalous results; for example, in the Northern Territory and Western Australia, a death during a dental procedure where a local anaesthetic has been injected into the gum for a filling would be reportable, but not the in-hospital death of a heavily sedated patient undergoing an invasive procedure.
It is important to remember that a medical-setting death that does not come within the 'anaesthetic' category will only be reportable if it falls into another more general category of reportable death in the relevant Coroners Act.
85) Each of these jurisdictions based its new definition of a medical-setting reportable death around the criterion that death was not a reasonably expected outcome.
This category of reportable death, introduced by the Coroners Act 2009 (NSW), replaced the former provision which required the reporting of a death that occurred during, or as a result of, or within 24 hours of the administration of an anaesthetic administered in the course of a medical, surgical or dental or like operation or procedure.
Among its aims are the investigation of reportable deaths in order to determine the identities of the people, the times, dates, manners and causes of their deaths.
Tenders are invited for the dublin district coroner is an independent official responsible for the medico-legal investigation of all sudden, unexpected, unnatural, unexplained, violent and other reportable deaths in dublin.
To counter the challenge of a possible increase in the number of reportable deaths and the expected burden to the investigative and medico-legal services, the law should provide in reported cases for the state forensic pathologist or inquest magistrate to have the discretion, in consultation with relevant medical specialist experts as required, to consider whether further medico-legal investigation is required.
T]he coroner's court only had jurisdiction over reportable deaths and since there was no birth there was no death.