replant

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re·plant

(rē-plant'),
1. To perform replantation.
2. A part or organ so replaced or about to be so replaced.

replant

(rē-plănt′)
tr.v. re·planted, re·planting, re·plants
1. To plant (something) again or in a new place: separated and replanted the perennials.
2. To supply with new plants: replant a window box.
3. To reattach (an organ or limbs, for example) surgically to the original site.
n. (rē′plănt′)
Something replanted.

re′plan·ta′tion n.

re·plant

(rē-plant')
1. To perform replantation.
2. A part or organ so replaced or about to be so replaced.
References in periodicals archive ?
The key technological advancement that ushered in the replant era came in 1960 when the American vascular surgeon Julius Jacobson introduced the microscope in the operating room.
(4-7) In that same year in Louisville, Kleinert and Kasdan replanted an incompletely amputated thumb and so began the race for the first digit replantation.
Word of these successes spread quickly across the globe to the East, and as mentioned earlier after "many failures," Komatsu and Tamai successfully replanted a completely amputated thumb in July 1965 to mark the first successful digit replantation.
Eighty-seven percent of patients were male, and the mean age of those patients replanted was 36 years, while the mean age of patients who underwent a completion amputation was 44 years.
One option for reconstructive surgery for tumors of the long bones is the replacement of the bone defect by a replant obtained from the resected bone after pretreatment directly during the operation [5].
The objective of this study is to determine the risk of osteosarcoma recurrence in the tissue of frozen and exposed radiation replant.
35 bones replant of dogs undergoing comprehensive treatment for osteosarcoma were studied.
Then all soft tissues were removed from the replant followed by the curettage of all contents of the medullary canal and fastened to the parent bone by plates or Ilizarov apparatus.
anacua than the replanted edge (P = .004) and the fallow edge plots (P = .008).
Large plant debris provided significantly more ground cover in the mature brushland than in the replanted and fallow habitats (Table 3).
The replanted habitat had large plant debris from Baccharis neglecta, L.
Baccharis neglecta dominated the midstory of the replanted edge and interior plots.