repetition-compulsion

rep·e·ti·tion-com·pul·sion

(rep'ĕ-tish'ŭn-kŏm-pŭl'shŭn),
In psychoanalysis, the tendency to repeat earlier experiences or actions, in an unconscious effort to achieve belated mastery over them; a morbid need to repeat a particular behavior such as handwashing or repeated checking to see whether the door is locked.

rep·e·ti·tion-com·pul·sion

(rep'ĕ-tish'ŭn-kŏm-pŭl'shŭn)
psychoanalysis The tendency to repeat earlier experiences or actions in an unconscious effort to achieve belated mastery over them; a morbid need to repeat a particular behavior, such as handwashing or checking to see whether the door is locked.
See: obsessive-compulsive disorder
References in periodicals archive ?
Kong illuminates the conflicting features of the literary diaspora that Tiananmen gave rise to: self-exoticization and melancholic repetition-compulsion on one side and a simultaneous critique of Chinese authoritarianism and global neoliberal capitalism on the other.
The final chapter trumps this argument by proposing that Hamlet should be read as an allegory of allegory, because Hamlet's repetition-compulsion makes him an allegorical image of the machine chine, the epitome of the modern capitalist economy, whose commodity fetishism turns everyone into a compulsive allegorist of one kind or another.
Since this is not an obviously adversarial position, I gather Lupton's psychoanalytic critique takes the sympathetic form of guiding the West to a degree of self-knowledge: our literature confronts its guilty reliance on Christian typology, and our philosophy acknowledges aesthetics as the symptom of this theological repetition-compulsion.
The repetition-compulsion principle is an important aspect of Freud's theory as a whole.
Even if the Hitcher is dead at the end, the boy is there to keep the repetition-compulsion alive.