repetition compulsion


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compulsion

 [kom-pul´shun]
1. a recurrent, unwanted, and distressing (ego-dystonic) urge to perform an act.
2. a compulsive act or ritual; a repetitive and stereotyped action that is performed to ward off some untoward event, although the patient recognizes that it does not do so in any realistic way. It serves as a defensive substitute for unacceptable unconscious ideas or impulses. Failure to perform the compulsive act gives rise to anxiety and tension. Common compulsions involve hand-washing, touching, counting, and checking. adj., adj compul´sive. See also obsessive-compulsive.
repetition compulsion in psychoanalytic theory, the impulse to reenact earlier emotional experiences.

repetition compulsion

Psychoanalysis The impulse to reenact earlier emotional experiences, considered by Freud more fundamental than the pleasure principle. Cf Pleasure principle.
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the play's entire theme of repetition compulsion hangs, not on a
(77) Drawing examples from Endgame, we have argued that melancholia, repetition compulsion, ambivalence, and moral masochism are among those destructive elements of death drive which push Hamm to his death.
With reified internal structures like this the past is endlessly repeated and enacted in the present of the individual; this is a slightly different usage of the repetition compulsion concept.
Social magma and repetition compulsion, surely, occurs in all disciplines and people.
Ali of this is of course reminiscent of Freud; for it was he, in Beyond the Pleasure Principle (1920), who formulated the notion of the "death instinct." But actually, the convergence of the two thinkers is still more interesting because in Freud's conception the death instinct is inextricably linked to the problem of repetition compulsion. Freud came to believe that the pleasure principle cannot explain all aspects of human motivation and that there are certain situations, such as those involving repetition compulsions, in which eros is overridden by "something that seems more primitive, more elementary, more instinctual." (24) Freud conceives of repetition compulsion not merely as a problem but as a coping mechanism, an attempted solution to a problem.
These people suffer from repetition compulsion. Dr.
Building on his previous work on psychoanalysis, The Power of the Inner Judge, in which he stresses the dialectical relationship between conflict and trauma and proposes the notion of "repetition compulsion" as a mechanism seeking to attain symbolic resolution of conflict and trauma, Wurmser (psychiatry, U.
"Trauma, Addiction, and Temporal Bulimia in Madame Bovary" (131-49) struggles to claim contemporary relevance for Emma with a twofold, self-contradictory implication: (1) Emma's condition, a repetition compulsion rooted in the failure to remember, uniquely foreshadows "our" condition (bearing "the prophetic traces of a depiction of the temporary structure of the many forms of trauma and addiction that have come to define contemporary American culture," 132 --"prophetic" suggesting a temporal leap); and (2) Emma's condition illustrates the human condition in general (Madame Bovary being "one of the most eloquent analyses of the temporal pathology of everyday life available to us," 134).
Endless killing therefore becomes the representation of a death drive that can thrive only via the repetition compulsion. At one point he talks to himself as if there were someone else present in the room, and says: "they don't know when to stop; that's wh y they have to be stopped." Clearly, we can see here a discursive displacement onto the other of an unconscious desire to be stopped, which is precisely the situation mapped out in The Hitcher.
Key therapy considerations are organized around the role of dissociation and repetition compulsion. Treatment addresses the feeling of solitude that can overwhelm those who are traumatized, the use of therapeutic animals, and parent-child interventions.
The irrational need to repeat a behavior notwithstanding, its consequence (repetition compulsion) seems to illustrate the method in which school districts attempt to elicit change.
The article traces how one's shadow sides are the repressed energy fixated at a given incomplete developmental stage, desperately avoiding the pain of the child's mistaken belief or personal "conclusion" (angst) and blindly repeating the personal "decision" of a behavioral strategy (neurotic repetition compulsion).