repercussive


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repercussive

(rē″pĕr-kŭs′ĭv)
1. Causing repercussion.
2. An agent that repels; a repellent.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most enlightening and repercussive conclusion in Edward Dutton's book is that there is a clear correlation between the extent to which a particular university experience is a rite of passage and the intensity, conservatism and exclusivity of the evangelicalism at that university.
A prominent and, among the young, possibly decisive argument of the 'No' campaign during Ireland's repercussive referendum on the Treaty of Lisbon in June 2008 was that ratification would remove Ireland's neutrality in security and defence matters (17) or, bluntly, control over where young Irish soldiers might be sent and who they might fight.
one of the most repercussive views of the "moral difference between
The novel's biphasic textuality in this sense contains the seeds of a hope that differentiates its imaginative designs from the movement of History within its representation--differentiates those designs, that is, from the model of history as repercussive ripples that perfectly transmit their traumatizing effects across any expanse of time and space.
This draft statute emphasizes the pedagogical thrust of the prohibition, downplays the repercussive role of the law, and embodies aspects of approaches adopted by those countries that have banned corporal punishment of children.
and most western democracies are founded on a separation of church and state, the total banishment of religion from public schools has the repercussive effect of weakening tolerance for the general practice of religion.