repeat

(redirected from repeat oneself)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

repeat

 [rĕ-pēt´]
something done or occurring more than once, particularly over and over.
long terminal r's identical nucleotide sequences occurring at each end of a proviral genome or a transposon and believed to be essential for integration of the molecule into host DNA.
tandem repeat appearance of two or more identicle segments close to each other within a strand of DNA.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

re·peat

(rep.) (rē-pēt')
Prescription directions for the pharmacist.
[L. repetatur, let it be repeated]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about repeat

Q. Now my question is: what kind of repetitive symptoms should I look for? I read the previous question about the early autism symptoms of a child. It is very beneficial. Now my question is: what kind of repetitive symptoms should I look for?

A. It depends upon your child’s health. Repetitive symptoms will vary from child to child but they will begin to show up at a very young age. Look for things such as stacking of items or lining items up compulsively. They may also have repetitive body movements such as hand flapping or body rocking. In some cases, the child may even injure themselves on a regular basis such as by biting their skin. As with most things, each individual child will display repetitive symptoms in their own way.

More discussions about repeat
This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's all a matter of looking for something different, so as not in repeat oneself."
No one likes to repeat oneself, least of all your boss.
The marginal comment adds: "Dissemi e vero, e se tu voi fare bene, varia sempre e fa piu tosto male." This satisfyingly epigrammatic remark, with its play on "far bene" and "far male" (Procacci rightly interprets it as "better to make a mistake than to repeat oneself")(50) could be taken to sum up the aesthetic of variety and novelty that was so central to Cinquecento Mannerism.