perfusion

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perfusion

 [per-fu´zhun]
1. the act of pouring through or over; especially the passage of a fluid through the vessels of a specific organ.
2. a liquid poured through or over an organ or tissue.
tissue perfusion the circulation of blood through the vascular bed of tissue.
ineffective tissue perfusion (specify type) (renal, cerebral, cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal, peripheral) a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual has a decrease in oxygen resulting in failure to nourish the tissues at the capillary level.

per·fu·sion

(per-fyū'zhŭn),
1. The act of perfusing.
2. The flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue, as in ventilation:perfusion ratio.

perfusion

(pər-fyo͞o′zhən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of perfusing.
2. The injection of fluid into a blood vessel in order to reach an organ or tissues, usually to supply nutrients and oxygen.

perfusion

Bathing an organ or tissue with a fluid. See Arterial perfusion, Hyperthermic perfusion, Isolated hepatic perfusion, Limb perfusion, Myocardial perfusion Oncology A technique used for a melanoma of an arm or leg; circulation to and from the limb is stopped with a tourniquet; chemotherapy is put directly into the circulation to ↑ regional drug dose Transplantation The intravascular irrigation of an isolated organ with blood, plasma or physiologic substance, to either studying its metabolism or physiology under 'normal' conditions or for maintaining the organ as 'fresh' as possible, while transporting donated organs to recipients. See Slush preparation.

per·fu·sion

(pĕr-fyū'zhŭn)
1. The act of perfusing.
2. The flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue, as in ventilation:perfusion ratio.

perfusion

1. The passage of blood or other fluids through the body.
2. The effectiveness with which a part, such as the brain, is supplied with blood.

perfusion

the passage of a liquid through an organ or tissue.

Perfusion

The passage of fluid (such as blood) through a specific organ or area of the body (such as the heart).
Mentioned in: Shock, Thallium Heart Scan

per·fu·sion

(pĕr-fyū'zhŭn)
Flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
These diagnoses are the human responses to health conditions and preventive interventions must be implemented jointly for the risk diagnoses/10,1" Five risk diagnoses were present in all hypertensive and diabetic subjects interviewed ("Risk for Ineffective Gastrointestinal Perfusion", "Risk for Ineffective Renal Perfusion", "Risk for Decreased Cardiac Tissue Perfusion", "Risk for Ineffective Peripheral Tissue Perfusion", "Risk for Impaired Cardiovascular Function"), and other five diagnoses ("Risk for Unstable Blood Glucose Levels", "Risk for Constipation", "Risk for Activity Intolerance", "Risk for Impaired Skin Integrity" and "Risk for Falls") score above the 50th percentile.
These findings suggest that the intraoperative and postoperative use of catecholamines to increase cardiac output and improve the patient's hemodynamics and renal perfusion flow could prevent and treat CIN in patients with impaired left ventricular function.
The patient's renal failure is most likely directly related to the CMV colitis and decreased renal perfusion due to an inability to keep the patient hydrated through such voluminous fluid loss.
Acute tubular necrosis is usually caused by direct drug toxicity, but prolonged impaired renal perfusion as described above may also cause tubular damage.
* Renal perfusion: normal volume of clear, yellow urine; normal lab values; normal BP.
(1) It is caused by a significant reduction in renal perfusion due to vasospasm, microvascular injury, intravascular coagulation or a combination of these factors.
Decreased renal perfusion pressure (RPP) and associated decreased glomerular filtration have been shown to be the key factors in the development of IAH-induced renal failure.
This ratio may increase when renal perfusion or urine flow is decreased, as in urinary tract obstruction or dehydration.
Ventilation parameters had to be ilacreased and therapeutic decompression paracentesis was performed in an attempt to improve renal perfusion. Despite all these measures, the patient developed multisystemic organ failure and died at 46 days of age, 28 days after admission.
Such factors could influence the extent to which renal perfusion pressure and renal vascular resistance responded to CHE-treatment, thus affecting sodium excretory function.
Dehydration alone can also cause impaired renal function by decreasing renal perfusion. These problems have been recognized among military personnel, long-distance runners, and other athletes [2-6].