renal nerve


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to renal nerve: Renal ischemia

renal nerve

The lowest (least) splanchnic nerve, which carries sympathetic axons to the renal plexus.
See also: nerve
References in periodicals archive ?
Patel, "Activation of afferent renal nerves modulates RVLM-projecting PVN neurons," American Journal of Physiology--Heart and Circulatory Physiology, vol.
Renal sympathetic nerve activity modulates afferent renal nerve activity by PGE2-dependent activation of alpha1- and alpha2-adrenoceptors on renal sensory nerve fibers.
After that conference in Singapore, the results of a very stringent study on renal nerve denervation came out.
Gelfand and Levin blame the improper response on malfunctioning sensors such as renal nerves, which send faulty signals to the brain.
In the control animals, the renal nerve was left intact and the animal was allowed to stand for an equivalent time period before commencing the experimental protocols.
Dr Dasgupta said: "Surround Sound therapy may target the renal nerves more accurately than catheter-based renal denervation.
Renal nerves are not necessary for onset or maintenance of DOC-salt hypertension in rats.
Similar to angioplasty, renal denervation involves snaking a catheter through the femoral artery up to the renal arteries, where it uses heat to deactivate the renal nerves (in the kidneys) which, in theory, lowers blood pressure.
The renal nerves are part of the sympathetic nervous system, which controls blood pressure.
Sulaiman Al-Habib Specialist Hospital has succeeded in helping five patients with chronic hypertension using second-generation devices to cauterize renal nerves via catheter.
We know the renal nerves play a crucial role in blood pressure elevation and this study shows those nerves can be targeted with renal denervation without major side effects," Dr Esler added.
These therapies may include treatments for plaque stabilization or reduction of angioplasty-induced inflammation in diseased vessels, drugs to disrupt the hyperactive renal nerves in hypertensive patients, anti-tumor drugs, growth factors to stimulate cell division, stem cell transplantation and gene therapies," said Kirk Seward of Mercator.