renal colic


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colic

 [kol´ik]
acute paroxysmal abdominal pain. It is particularly common during the first three months of life; the infant has paroxysmal, unexplained crying and may pull up arms and legs, turn red-faced, and expel gas from the anus or belch it up from the stomach. The exact cause of infantile colic is not known but several factors may contribute to it, including excessive swallowing of air, too rapid feeding or overfeeding, parental anxiety, allergy to milk, or other feeding problems. It generally occurs at the same time of day, usually at the busiest period. The parents need sympathetic support and assurance that the condition is not serious and most infants gain weight and are healthy in spite of the colic.
biliary colic colic due to passage of gallstones along the bile duct.
gastric colic gastrodynia.
lead colic colic due to lead poisoning.
menstrual colic dysmenorrhea.
renal colic intermittent, acute pain beginning in the kidney region and radiating forward and down to the abdomen, genitalia, and legs; the usual cause is calculi in a kidney or ureter. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, and a desire to urinate frequently.

re·nal col·ic

severe colicky pain caused by the impaction or passage of a calculus in the ureter or renal pelvis.

renal colic

Nephrology A colicky pain typical of Pts passing kidney stones

re·nal col·ic

(rē'năl kol'ik)
Sharp pain in the lower back that radiates down the flank and into the groin; associated with the passage of a renal calculus through the ureter as it dilates the ureter, causing ureteral spasms as the calculus is forced along the narrow tube; usually of sudden onset, severe and colicky (intermittent), and not improved by changes in position. Nausea and vomiting are common.

renal colic

Severe, periodic pain in the loin usually caused by the spasmodic muscular efforts of the tube from the kidney to the bladder (the ureter) to force an obstructing body, such as a kidney stone (calculus), downwards. Renal colic may also be caused by blood clots in the ureter.

re·nal col·ic

(rē'năl kol'ik)
Severe colicky pain caused by impaction or passage of dental calculus in the ureter or renal pelvis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of these patients, approximately 200 are admitted due to renal colic. This study involved 100 participants who had been admitted to the ED with renal colic, with the numbers of enrolled females and males being 36 (36%) and 64 (64%), respectively.
There does not appear to be any reason to bolus hydrate patients with acute renal colic.
describe a case of renal tumor detected in the ED by using EUS for assessment of suspected renal colic [13,14].
Right-sided renal colic with haematuria and strangury, and frequent ineffectual urging for urination with dribbling of urine are common pointers to Nux vomica, particularly in thin, irritable, and nervous people.
After approval by our institutional research ethics board, we performed a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients who presented to the ED of a Canadian tertiary hospital with renal colic between 2011 and 2013.
The following complications were reported for group I: fever in 12 children (18.5%), pain in the type of renal colic in 13 children (20%), transient hematuria in 10 children (15.38%), Clavien grade I, and urinary tract infection in 11 children (16.92%), Clavien grade II.
KEY WORDS: Urolithiasis, Urinary Tract Stones, Renal Colic; Hematuria; Renal Failure; Urinalysis; Hypercalciuria; Hyperoxaluria; Hyperuricosuria; Hypocitraturia.
Objective: To investigated oxidative stress changes in renal colic patients, and to determine its role in differential diagnosis of renal colic.
Initial symptoms may be variable and non-specific, including polyuria, proteinuria, microscopic hematuria or renal colic due to urolithiasis.
According to Retrophin, Thiola is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of cystinuria, a rare genetic cystine transport disorder that causes high cystine levels in the urine and the formation of recurring kidney stones, causing loss of kidney function, substantial pain and loss of productivity associated with renal colic and stone passage.
The diagnosis of acute AoD is often delayed secondarily to its propensity to masquerade as other illnesses (i.e., renal colic, spinal-cord injury, and acute cauda equina syndrome) that result in acute lower-back pain (LBP).