renal artery thrombosis

renal artery thrombosis

Acute renal arterial thrombosis, renal artery occlusion Nephrology Abrupt occlusion of RA which, if complete, may cause permanent renal failure; loss of function of one kidney may be asymptomatic as 2nd kidney adequately filters blood–HTN is typical; without a 2nd functional kidney, RAT may cause acute kidney failure Etiology Acute RAT may follow abdominal injury, embolism, especially in Pts with heart disease–eg, A Fib, smoking, RA stenosis Management Surgery
References in periodicals archive ?
The most important and most common complications are acute rejection, acute tubular necrosis, renal artery thrombosis, renal vein thrombosis, perinephric fluid collections, urinary obstruction, renal artery stenosis, aneurysmal dilatation of the renal artery, arteriovenous fistula, and chronic rejection.
If spontaneous renal artery thrombosis is not diagnosed early and is not treated properly, it results in renal insufficiency due to renal infarction.
Patient Complications 1 Immediate renal artery thrombosis necessitating retransplantation of the kidney in the contralateral iliac fossa 2 Urinary infection 3 None 4 Acute tubular necrosis, pneumonia 5 Intestinal occlusion medically resolved 6 Urinary infection 7 None 8 Urinary infection 9 None
Successful percutaneous renal intervention in a patient with acute traumatic renal artery thrombosis. Circulation 2006; 114:e583-585.
Spontaneous renal artery thrombosis without any obvious underlying cause in an otherwise healthy patient is rare.
The constellation of findings was concerning for renal artery thrombosis and impending infarct.
It has been reported that, in the setting of renal artery thrombosis, there may be a great variability in laboratory values depending on the number and size of segmental arteries affected, the intensity of ischemic injury, the time of development, and the presence of collateral circulation.
Postoperative complications recorded included renal artery thrombosis, renal vein thrombosis, ureteric leak or stenosis, reoperation for bleeding, or any other event requiring reoperation.
Late allograft thrombosis has been defined as occurring later than 14 days postoperatively, but rarely renal artery thrombosis may develop a few months post-transplantation13.
Although it most commonly develops due to renal artery thrombosis, it may also be caused by an array of factors.
Gambari, "Renal artery thrombosis and hypertension in a 13 year old girl with antiphospholipid syndrome," Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, vol.
In this case of acute renal artery thrombosis, restoration of diuresis was achieved within 8 hours after beginning of thrombolytic therapy.