remember

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re·mem·ber

(rĭ-mĕm′bər)
v.
1. To recall to the mind; think of again.
2. To retain in the memory.
3. To return to an original shape or form after being deformed or altered.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Patient discussion about remember

Q. Do you remember the popcorn diet Madonna was on? Can anyone explain how does this diet work?

A. thanks for valuable info!
I searched for it here on iMedix and indeed found several articles about the subject. One of them is: http://www.dietbites.com/article0158.html

Q. I suffer from depression and feel many times that I cannot remember things. Here's another question that I encounter a lot of times: "I suffer from depression and feel many times that I cannot remember things. Is there a relationship between Depression and Alzheimer disease?"

A. Daphna, I appreciate your taking the time for this question. It is something I worry about and just discussed with my doctor last week. I know that for me, some days are more difficult (kind of cloudy) than others. Some days it seems to take me all day to get my daily reading/prayer/meditation done. But I am no longer in a hurry now that I am retired. My doctor said all I needed was a cup of coffee to get going and that always helps me just fine. Walking for me is also very stimulating. Seems like when I get back from a walk, I get a new persective on things. Thanks again Daphna.

Q. I'm having problem remembering how to operate a computer software. Is learning possible only at a young age? I have been trying to learn a new software program that my kids got me but I keep forgetting how to get it started. Is learning possible only at a young age?

A. This is a common concern among older adults. However the answer is actually- not at all. People can learn throughout their life span. In fact, it is important to continue and learn new skills as we age. Learning new skills, like new games, new dances, and a new language, and playing a musical instrument, help keep our mind sharp longer. With age, we may be slower to pick up new information. However, the ability to learn does not go away unless we are inflicted with dementia. It may require more effort but you can continue to learn.

More discussions about remember
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References in classic literature ?
It is not logically necessary to the existence of a memory-belief that the event remembered should have occurred, or even that the past should have existed at all.
But I never did--although I continued to loathe him as I remembered him before.
"No, Sonya, but do you remember so that you remember him perfectly, remember everything?" said Natasha, with an expressive gesture, evidently wishing to give her words a very definite meaning.
I remember laughing at that, and wondering why I laughed.
"I remember a certain famous occasion when you forced me to confess that you had been drinking."
And though he never knew us very well, he seems to remember us and to be excited by us, too.
Exactly what happened next I cannot remember. I only remember that several other officers were present as well as he.
Then I remembered seeing the grown-ups blow the foam away before they drank.
I remember the time by the sudden brightness and clearness, the feverish strain and excitement of all my faculties which came with it.
I should never have asked you if Molly had been here, for I remember you don't like English cookery."
And do you remember you bid he should not ride him into the water?
It was many years ago, but I remember well the captain of the wool-clipper nodding at her with the words, "Fancy having to go about the sea in a thing like that!"