religious objects


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re·li·gious ob·jects

, sacred objects
hierophobia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Tabot are sacred religious objects used by all Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Churches around the world.
In October last year a group of witches in the poor Sao Joao de Meriti district of Rio told how born again bandits had also forced them to destroy their religious objects - or face terrifying consequences.
'Balaan nga balay' means 'divine house,' and the exhibit was mounted by theology seminarians of UST to educate future priests on the importance of religious objects and structures.
Constitution permits the government to include religious objects and sites within an aid program under certain conditions.
Religious objects have also been carefully displayed with their ceremonial functions in mind.
Once in the museum, guests were free to wander the many galleries housing the ornate exhibit, which stretched from the Anna Wintour Costume Center downstairs, where the Vatican collection was being displayed, to the Byzantine and medieval galleries on the main floor, where designer fashions were interspersed among the religious objects and artworks.
The important usages of these religious objects are discussed below.
The custody of religious objects and locations raises particular problems and inevitable grey areas.
The collection included crosses, altars and (https://www.jstor.org/stable/4300877?seq=1#fndtn-page_scan_tab_contents) other religious objects .
Contributors from museum studies, architecture, and religion consider religion in museums from the perspectives of museum buildings; objects, museums, and religions; museum collecting and research; museum interpretation of religion and religious objects; and presenting religion in a variety of museums.
Additionally, a rich collection of colonial art--including painting, furnishings, and religious objects created in Venezuela between 17th and 19th centuries--is complemented by artworks and documentation of those who explored Latin America and the Caribbean during that time.
While Bartl characterized Egerland Germans as "religious yet not overly pious," the section on destroyed religious objects portrays Catholicism as a vibrant element of Sudeten identity.