doctrine

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doc·trine

(dok'trin),
A particular system of principles taught or advocated.
[L. doceo, to teach]
A theory or posit widely accepted by leading authorities in a particular field

doctrine

A theory or posit widely accepted by leading authorities in a particular field. See Assumption-of-risk doctrine, Borrowed servant doctrine, Captain-of-the-ship doctrine, De minimus doctrine, Emergency doctrine, Feres doctrine, Humoral doctrine, Hypothesis, Lost-opportunity doctrine, Posit, Therapeutic privilege.

doctrine

(dok'trin) [Fr. doctrine, fr L. doctrina, teaching]
A system of principles taught or advocated.

borrowed servant doctrine

The legal doctrine, a form of vicarious liability, that a patient care supervisor (e.g., an attending physician who oversees the work of a resident physician) may be held responsible for the negligent acts of a subordinate. See: Captain of the Ship doctrine ; vicarious liability

Captain of the Ship doctrine

The legal doctrine, a form of vicarious liability, that the legal responsibility for errors in a medical setting falls on the most highly trained or senior health care provider present at the time. This doctrine has been used to hold attending physicians or surgeons responsible for the negligent acts of the surgical or anesthesia team. See: borrowed servant doctrine; vicarious liability

learned intermediary doctrine

The legal doctrine that a pharmaceutical manufacturer need only advise or warn physicians, and not the public at large, of the potential hazards of the drugs it produces. Under this doctrine physicians act as agents for the public when they prescribe medications. Their education and clinical experience help them decide when to use a medication and when, because of safety concerns, to avoid its use. Exceptions to the doctrine are illustrated by direct-to-consumer drug advertising (e.g., on television or the Internet) in which pharmaceutical companies present their products directly to patients without the physician acting as intermediary. Synonym: learned intermediary rule
References in periodicals archive ?
not require becoming enmeshed in religious doctrine.
In his illuminating contribution to the Symposium, Professor Andrew Koppelman likewise aims to answer the basic question of "why it is regarded as appropriate for government to keep its hands off religious doctrine.
86) The state courts, however, cannot apply a departure-from-doctrine method because the Supreme Court has clearly stated that any inquiry involving an examination of religious doctrine and practice is unconstitutional, pursuant to the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment--even if the inquiry is factual in nature.
He said: "Intelligent Design is a religious doctrine that has no place in the science curriculum.
A Midland Christian school joined 40 others yesterday in claiming it can smack pupils with parents' consent because it is part of a religious doctrine protected by the European Convention on Human Rights.
PRIVATE Christian schools can smack pupils with parents' consent because it is part of a religious doctrine protected by the European Convention on Human Rights, the Court of Appeal was told yesterday.
The American Civil Liberties Union, which does not support religious doctrine being taught in public schools, threatened a lawsuit against the board if it had voted to teach creationism, according to published reports.
Citing a religious doctrine to murder more than 5,000 people is dubious, and it is difficult to imagine that provoking war with the world's most powerful nations is a politically prudent thing to do.
On the other hand, religious doctrine claiming that the orbits of the planets are perfect circles, or that the Sun i s Apollo in his fiery chariot, are demonstrably false and mostly have passed from being a part of living religions into historical curiosities.
The more general point of this analysis of religious doctrine is that economics is in service to morality, not that moral values are to be trumped by economic growth policies.
He defined religious doctrine as `a defense against religious experience.
He revives the old terminology of "Counter-Reformation" for Catholic reform since, in his view, "all significant changes in religious doctrine that were made in the sixteenth century were on the Protestant side.