relaxation training


Also found in: Acronyms.

relaxation training

Alternative psychology
A generic term for any of a number of techniques—e.g., hypnosis, electromyography feedback, relaxing imagery—for relaxing muscles. Relaxation training is reportedly successful in reducing the duration, frequency and intensity of anticipatory nausea associated with chemotherapy.

relaxation training

Psychology Any technique–eg, hypnosis, electromyograph feedback, relaxing imagery, etc, for relaxing mind or muscle. See Autogenic feedback training, Biofeedback training, Breathing exercises, Imagery & visualization, Meditation, Progressive relaxation, Systematic desensitization, Yoga.
References in periodicals archive ?
The social control group (relaxation training group (RTG)) received relaxation training consisting of progressive muscle relaxation, autogenic training, back training, breathing exercises, massage, and Qigong.
Determination of the impact of progressive relaxation training on###Master###2002###46 patients undergoing###Experimental
(16) investigated the effect of electromyographic (EMG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) BF relaxation trainings on generalized anxiety disorders.
Swimmers ability to relax an important role in improving performance through the ability of the natural relaxation training can speed up the nervous system excitation and inhibition athletes' conversion rate, increased muscle contraction force, to reduce the resistance and energy consumption.
A biofeedback-assisted relaxation training (BART) program for nursing students may help students learn to control their physiological and psychological reactions associated with test anxiety and positively impact attrition rates.
Integration of myofascial trigger point release and paradoxical relaxation training treatment of chronic pelvic pain in men.
Indeed, relaxation training has been tried and practiced by many peoples of the world throughout the years; though, in a variety of forms.
Mindfulness based mind body programs such as stress reduction and biofeedback, which usually involve relaxation training and imagery, have been shown to be effective in reducing pain, improving HRQOL and improving gastrointestinal and other chronic disorders.
The subjects reported that they had never received any relaxation training. Consent forms were obtained from both the participants and their parents.
Identified interventions included: relaxation training, psychological or cognitive behaviour treatment, self-monitoring programs, biofeedback treatment, hypnosis training, medication use, massage therapy and acupuncture treatment.
While I cannot speak to all of the areas of concern, the emphasis on the effects of thinking on mood, along with the neurogenerative benefits of exercise end relaxation training on the brain, are solid end supported by the latest neuroscience.