relativism


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relativism

 [rel´ah-tiv″izm]
a philosophical system that considers truth to be dependent on individual persons, cultural contexts, times, or places.
cultural relativism the understanding of distinct cultures and lifestyles within the context of each culture; the behaviors of a cultural group are evaluated in the context of that specific culture, from an impartial perspective, rather than according to the standards of some other culture.
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Moral relativism, on the other hand, is the degree to which an individual rejects universal moral rules when making ethical judgments.
Relativist John MacFarlane claims that speaker relativism is inadequate.
The essence of Sikka's thesis is that Herder's universalism and relativism find their connection through his insistence on employing an anthropological and empirical--and thus, in a Kantian sense, thoroughly "pre-critical"--lens through which to ask questions about happiness, identity, morality, or any other such quality about which we might be called to make judgments.
Between Relativism and Fundamentalism: Religious Resources for a Middle Position
The acquisition of multiple knowledge perspectives, and careful reflection on the relative importance as well as validity of these perspectives constitute the main ideas about "epistemic relativism" for online PA.
One quick comment on Duke Pesta's "Moral Relativism" article in TNA: His opinion that almost all the Republican or Libertarian presidential candidates would at least consider eliminating the Department of Education is overly optimistic at best and sadly naive at worst.
According to moral relativism, it makes no sense to ask the abstract question whether a given act is good or bad.
"When policies do not presume or promote objective values, the resulting moral relativism tends instead to produce frustration, despair, selfishness and a disregard for the life and liberty of others," he added.
Einstein never reconciled himself to quantum theory, which ironically relies on a type of relativism or indeterminacy - the idea that the precise positions of some particles cannot be determined.
The Sophists of Socrates' day were as beguiled by relativism as our contemporaries, doubtless for essentially the same reason.
Forsyth (1980) suggests that the two dimensions of relativism and idealism, applied to individuals, describe their ethical ideology.