reject

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reject

(rĭ-jĕkt′)
tr.v. re·jected, re·jecting, re·jects
1. To spit out or vomit: The baby rejected the medicine.
2. Medicine To resist immunologically the introduction of (a transplanted organ or tissue); fail to accept as part of one's own body.

re·ject′er, re·jec′tor n.
re·jec′tion (-jĕk′shən) adj.
re·jec′tive adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
DC offset estimated from this result is excluded by DC rejecter for improving signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) in decoding process.
In this paper, a new approach is presented where the supplementary heat rejecter is replaced by a PCM-sand ring around a regular grouted borehole.
Host aggression is probably the first opportunity to defend against parasitism (Robertson and Norman, 1976; Sealy et al., 1998; Strausberger, 2001) and, as accepters, blackbirds would be expected to be more vigilant and defensive than rejecter species (Neudorf and Sealy, 1992; Sealy et al., 1998).
Erasmus of Rotterdam, an influential humanist and rejecter of war, regarded the Ottoman Turks as barbarians and monstrous beasts, and thus approved of war against them.
The funny irony that one is now unable to ignore is how Israel is crying wolf to an imaginary nuclear Iran, whereas to this day Israel is a persistent rejecter of any efforts to make it become a party to any international convention on nuclear armaments or even nuclear power and has been a strong backer of Indian nuclear attainment.
And to our disappointment, and the International communityAAEs as well, Israel has always proved to be the rejecter of peace efforts, as it has consistently refused to abide by international conventions and resolutions, and even to carry out its commitment towards the occupied land.
(And surely a person cannot instantaneously alter his entire belief system to incorporate such whims.) If Jones makes a poorly thought-out choice to play Russian roulette, even though he is not suicidal and even though this foolish risk may destroy his otherwise rational life, a rejecter of the "dispositional view" of agency holds that the whim better expresses Jones's good than do the settled preferences and values he has developed over time.
In addition, rejected helpers regarded the recipient as being too defensive in viewing the offer of help, felt that the recipient had not realized the importance of accepting help, and devalued the rejecter to a greater extent than they did to the self(Cheuk & Rosen, 1993, 1996).
Heliodorus's stepmother, Attic Demainete, murders her kin, and the Machiavellian mother and "princess," Egyptian Arsake, nearly executes her male rejecter and her female rival (Aeth.
Hawthorne saw Emerson as an "everlasting rejecter of all that is, and seeker for he knows not what." In his Mosses from an Old Manse (1846), Hawthorne ridicules Emerson's followers as "bores of very intense water." This collection of stories confirms Hawthorne's more sensible attitude toward existence and one that recognizes the existence of evil.
He is, they argued, the typical dependent clinger who turns into a help rejecter, a type of patient whom family physicians always find very difficult.
Cultural critics have objected to the way the Shakespearean intertext may stifle the emancipatory potential of the film's depiction of counter-cultural and gay life: the heterosexual bourgeois Scott as Hal repudiates Mike as lover and Bob as Falstaffian principle, though the rejected continues to admire the rejecter. (38) However, to read intertextuality by weighing a conservative Shakespearean tradition against a depiction of the contemporary carnivalesque assumes referents for the signs of Idaho that are challenged throughout, but especially in its climactic parallel funerals.