reinoculation


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Related to reinoculation: ostial, perivenous

re·in·oc·u·la·tion

(rē'in-ok'yū-lā'shŭn),
Reinfection by means of inoculation.

reinoculation

(re?in-ok?u-la'shun) [? + in, into, + oculus, bud]
A second inoculation with the same organism or its antigens.
See: reinfection
References in periodicals archive ?
The reinoculation of microorganisms every 24 hours during the culture led to an improvement in deproteination (83 versus 99%), indicating the greater availability of extracellular proteases due to higher bacterial populations.
In dark conditions diatom densities were low during most of the experiment, despite reinoculation efforts (Fig.
The restoration strategies included the emptying of the lake and treatment of the sediments in order to avoid reinoculation by M.
Infectivity was excluded by reinoculation in Vero cell cultures, with 3 subsequent passages.
All birds used in this reinoculation study had recovered from previous infection between 27 and 83 days after inoculation.
The first failure required a two-week reinoculation of the BWP; as a result, the WRS manager assigned humans to monitor the control system around the clock.
Three different treatments of the soils were performed: (1) steam sterilisation in autoclave (120[degrees]C for 1 h), in order to eliminate the native microflora; (2) reinoculation of autoclaved samples by adding 1 g of non-treated soil; (3) carbon supply--a mixture of cellulose (0.
In the reinoculation stage, three check plants that were the same age as the test plants to be reinoculated and three 2-wk-old checks were inoculated periodically during the reinoculation to assure that the inoculum was virulent.
Although some organic oils and other natural products have antimicrobial activity, their biocidal capabilities are limited and they usually cannot withstand the continuous reinoculation that most personal care products must endure.
The consumption of diatoms corresponds to the plate rotation rather than to reinoculation.