reinforce

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Related to reinforced: Reinforced Plastic

reinforce

also

re-enforce

or

reenforce

(rē′ĭn-fôrs′)
tr.v. rein·forced, rein·forcing, rein·forces
Psychology
a. To reward (an experimental subject, for example) with a reinforcer subsequent to a desired response or performance.
b. To encourage (a response) by means of a reinforcer.

re′in·force′a·ble adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
At this stage the calculated deflection value and a rigidity of low reinforced structures operating without cracks in the tension zone are calculated.
In this research, an attempt has been made to accommodate the influence of the concrete cracking and bond-slip in the reinforced concrete structure by constructing a FEM with the discrete crack approach.
North America dominated global sales in the carbon fiber reinforced plastics market in 2014; however, Europe is witnessing the fastest growth rate among all regions.
The toughest internally reinforced coating previously tested was able to reach 20,000 cycles of the Reciprocating Abrasion Test before failure.
Reinforced Plastics (published 04/2003, 273 pages) is available for $3,900 from The Freedonia Group, Inc.
To make up for the difference in strength, the Petronas Towers' builders had to use a lot of reinforced concrete.
This unique report analyzes the status of the Indian Reinforced Plastics industry in 2012.
The reinforced concrete used in the construction of the Bellaire is typical of the majority of residential buildings in New York City and the relatively minor damage sustained there during the crash that claimed the lives of the two men bodes well for the rest of the city's high-rise homes, according to those in the industry.
The golden anniversary meeting of the Society of Automotive Engineers featured a symposium on "Fiber Glass Reinforced Plastic--An Automotive Body Material.
Plastics and reinforced plastics can resist some of the chemicals that are most damaging to metals, although they may themselves be susceptible to stress cracking as a result of the combination of stress and chemicals, according to Rapra.
Nevertheless, reinforced thermoplastics will exhibit better growth because of customer needs for higher performing products with broadened design parameters.