reinfection


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Related to reinfection: autoinfection, superinfection

reinfection

 [re″in-fek´shun]
a second infection by the same agent.

re·in·fec·tion

(rē'in-fek'shŭn),
A second infection by the same microorganism, after recovery from or during the course of a primary infection.

reinfection

(rē′ĭn-fĕk′shən)
n.
A second infection that follows recovery from a previous infection by the same causative agent.

re′-in·fect′ v.

re·in·fec·tion

(rē'in-fek'shŭn)
A second infection by the same microorganism, after recovery from or during the course of a primary infection.

reinfection

Another infection after full or partial recovery from an earlier infection with the same organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Only 144 (8%) of these 1,814 cases involved reinfection with an enterovirus of the same serotype: 99 (5.5%) with EV-A71 and 45 (2.5%) with CV-A16 (Figure 1).
In addition, some studies have shown that there was little to no reinfection in patients with undetectable HBV DNA pre- and post-LT (30).
Vaccination could potentially prevent reinfection in older men who have already contracted the virus.
The STD guideline of the US CDC considers persistent infection as reinfection with bacteria, mycoplasma, or anaerobic bacteria.
(17) At a minimum 2-year follow-up, they found that the group receiving oral suppression had no reinfections compared to a 13.6% reinfection rate in those with only perioperative IV antibiotics.
Noninferiority for reinfection and death could not be shown because there were too few of these events.
It has been reported that the rate of reinfection with schistosome parasites following Praziquantel treatment is faster with Schistosoma mansoni than with Schistosoma haematobium [25, 49-51].
These positive tests may represent noncompliance with treatment, reinfection from either the same or a new partner, or treatment failure related to a resistant organism.
While we have drugs to treat both HIV and HCV, these are out of reach for many and do not prevent reinfection, said lead researcher Lucy Dorrell, professor at University of Oxford in London.
Further, they show that the system can protect cells from reinfection and that the technology is safe for the cells, with no toxic effects.
They were then randomized to receive either doxycycline or azithromycin, and followed up with chlamydia testing 28 days after treatment, which included genotyping to distinguish between treatment failure and reinfection.
An increase in circulating antibodies could significantly decrease the length of an illness, may indicated an increase in memory cells created during the infection which would have implications on the potential to be sickened by reinfection.