reimportation

(redirected from reimport)
Also found in: Dictionary, Financial, Wikipedia.

reimportation

(rē″ĭm-pawr-tā′shŭn)
The purchase of drugs manufactured in their source nation by another nation to which the drugs are exported. At times it yields significant price advantages to the purchaser. Drugs manufactured in the U.S. are sometimes marketed abroad to other nations at low cost. The purchase of these drugs by American consumers from foreign pharmacies may yield cost savings accompanied by the risk that they may prove to be counterfeit or contaminated versions of the originals.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
market in 1989 and is going to be ''reimported'' to Japan this time.
If you are only allowed to reimport drugs made here, then the control of what amount of product can be reimported can be controlled by what amount of that product is sent out of the United States," Elliott said.
Also, to ensure that all drugs are made and handled according to FDA specifications, only a drug's manufacturer is permitted to import or reimport prescription drugs into the United States.
Congressional negotiators also declined to include a provision that would have made it easier to reimport drugs from Canada (which has been used as a stopgap measure to bring cheaper drugs to U.S.
Yet despite this unwitting generosity, I cannot legally visit those countries and reimport what my subsidy sold them on the cheap in the first place.
Also, the bill makes it virtually impossible to reimport cheaper drugs from Canada.
In other words, in order to reimport the aircraft, it must have landed in a foreign destination.
A 1980 law forbids the reimportation of drugs into the United States and authorizes the sending of warning letters to consumers who do reimport, informing them that they are breaking the law.
The National Community Pharmacists Association is pressing Congress to allow retailers to buy drugs overseas--where prices are a fraction of the amount charged in the U.S.--for reimport into the United States.
Thomas shows how, to allay such concerns, jurists reimport the transcendental, status-based conceptions of society by reinscribing boundaries separating certain domestic relations and issues from the unpredictable and dangerously democratic contractual approach.
Yet in this closing statement Komesaroff does seem--inevitably, I believe--to reimport some concern with principles: even the process of interchange has "microethical structures" that are subject to "requirements." The books under review allow us to begin to elaborate these requirements, which can be presented as quite different principles from those of bioethical principlism.