regulation


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Related to regulation: Self regulation

regulation

 [reg″u-la´shun]
1. the act of adjusting or state of being adjusted to a certain standard.
2. in biology, the adaptation of form or behavior of an organism to changed conditions.
3. the power to form a whole embryo from stages before the gastrula.
4. the biochemical mechanisms that control the expression of genes.
hemodynamic regulation in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as optimization of heart rate, preload, afterload and contractility. See also hemodynamic monitoring.
temperature regulation in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as attaining and/or maintaining body temperature within a normal range.
temperature regulation: intraoperative in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as attaining and/or maintaining desired intraoperative body temperature.

reg·u·la·tion

(reg'yū-lā'shŭn),
1. An epigentic process whereby the developmental fates of rates of cell development of embryonic subsystems may change during embryonic development, thereby compensating for defects and permitting normal development of the embryo as a whole. The human embryo is termed regulatory because its tissues and organs are not determined but become so according to the relationship of the different parts to each other.
2. In experimental embryology, the power of a pregastrula embryo to continue approximately normal development after a part or parts have been manipulated or destroyed.
[L. regula, a rule]

regulation

(rĕg′yə-lā′shən)
n.
1. The act of regulating or the state of being regulated.
2. Embryology The capacity of an embryo to continue normal development following injury to or alteration of a structure.

reg·u·la·tion

(reg'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. Control of the rate or manner in which a process progresses or a product is formed.
2. experimental embryology The power of a pregastrula embryo to continue approximately normal development after a part or parts have been manipulated or destroyed.
3. A rule or order issued by a regulatory agency of government or some other recognized authority (e.g., a rule on licensure of health care professionals issued by a state, province, or any other subnational jurisdiction).
[L. regula, a rule]

regulation

  1. (in embryology) the process of determining normal development, even in cases of damage, where a properly formed embryo may result even after the loss of a large part. In many animals regulation after damage is possible only before fertilization but in others it may take place in later development.
  2. the limitation of a population over a period of time by natural factors such as DENSITY DEPENDENT FACTORS.

Patient discussion about regulation

Q. My hormones are always out of wake. How can I regulate my periods? I like to try with herbs. I am 32 years old and I have 2 children. After my second delivery I had irregular periods. I have been on BC most of my life to regulate my periods but I don't like them. And I feel sick. My physician said that my thyroid is low but within normal range. My hormones are always out of wake. How can I regulate my periods? I like to try with herbs.

A. My dear your decision is good. There is nothing to feel sick; most of the women are having this problem. My daughter had the same problem like you; we tried so many meds but in vain. At last we tried with herbal meds really it is amazing, after that she had regular period. Now she is happy. I suggest you to try with herbal meds. Good Luck.

More discussions about regulation
References in periodicals archive ?
Six regulations on New and Renewable Energy and Conservation (EBTKE) are:
To implement this adjustment, the 1991 proposed regulations required taxpayers to maintain both equity and basis pools.
OIRA oversees the implementation of many governmentwide policies, including the adoption of new regulations. For regulations, its emphasis is on impact analysis, particularly of economic impacts, as well as interagency coordination of regulations and consideration of alternative rules and regulatory approaches.
The states claimed the turf of insurance regulation early on, and the federal government raised little objection.
Since that was the SEC's goal in issuing regulation FD, companies actually or seemingly not complying may attract the attention of the commission's enforcement division.
The federal government's ability to regulate within an area is significant because federal regulation means that a single, nationwide scheme may be in effect, rather than potentially dozens of conflicting or overlapping state schemes.
Even as states are working to sort out their regulations, federal attention is now turning toward the industry in earnest.
Aggrieved businesses already have the right to challenge regulation. And a vast majority of regulatory decisions are appealed in courts--including 80 percent of the Environmental Protection Agency's and 96 percent of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's.
Second, know and understand the EPA regulations and their preambles, especially those pertaining to land disposal, and determine how they impact specific foundry wastes.
So, the era of substantive financial regulation began in reaction to the stock market crash of 1929 and the Great Depression that followed.
As proposals designed to place regulatory control in the hands of the federal government continue to be brought before legislators, supporters of state regulation believe these proposals will lessen the power of state regulators, jeopardize companies' competitive market structure and hinder consumer protection.