regression


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Related to regression: regression analysis, regression equation, linear regression, correlation

regression

 [re-gresh´un]
1. return to a former or earlier state.
2. subsidence of symptoms or of a disease process.
3. in biology, the tendency in successive generations toward the mean.
4. an unconscious defense mechanism used to resolve conflict or frustration by returning to a behavior that was effective in earlier years. Some degree of regression frequently accompanies physical illness. Patients who are mentally ill may exhibit regression to an extreme degree, reverting all the way back to infantile behavior; this is called atavistic regression. adj., adj regres´sive.

re·gres·sion

(rē-gresh'ŭn),
1. A subsidence of symptoms.
2. A relapse; a return of symptoms.
3. Any retrograde movement or action.
4. A return to a more primitive mode of behavior due to an inability to function adequately at a more adult level.
5. An unconscious defense mechanism by which there occurs a return to earlier patterns of adaptation.
6. The distribution of one random variable given particular values of other variables relevant to it (for example, a formula for the distribution of weight as a function of height and chest circumference). The method was formulated by Galton in his study of quantitative genetics.
[L. regredior, pp. -gressus, to go back]

regression

/re·gres·sion/ (re-gresh´un)
1. return to a former or earlier state.
2. subsidence of symptoms or of a disease process.
3. in biology, the tendency in successive generations toward the mean.
4. defensive retreat to an earlier, often infantile, pattern of behavior or thought.
5. a functional relationship between a random variable and the corresponding values of one or more independent variables.regres´sive

regression

(rĭ-grĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The process or an instance of regressing, as to a less perfect or less developed state.
2. Psychology Reversion to an earlier or less mature pattern of feeling or behavior.
3. Medicine Subsidence of the symptoms or process of a disease.
4. Statistics A technique for predicting the value of a dependent variable as a function of one or more independent variables in the presence of random error.

regression

[rigresh′ən]
Etymology: L, regredi, to go back
1 a retreat or backward movement in conditions, signs, or symptoms.
2 a return to an earlier, more primitive form of behavior.
3 a tendency in physical development to become more typical of the population than of the parents, such as a child who attains a height closer to the average than to that of tall or short parents. regress, v.

regression

Any return to an original state. See Atavistic regression, Generalized additive logistic regression, Hypnotic age regression, Least-squares regression, Linear regression, Past life regression, Psychoregression Medtalk The subsiding of disease Sx or a return to a state of health Oncology A receding of CA Psychiatry A partial, symbolic, conscious, or unconscious desire to return–regress to a state of dependency, as in an infantile pattern of reacting or thinking, which occurs in normal sleep, play, physical illness, and in various mental disorders.

re·gres·sion

(rĕ-gresh'ŭn)
1. A subsidence of symptoms.
2. A relapse; a return of symptoms.
3. Any retrograde movement or action.
4. A return to a more primitive mode of behavior due to an inability to function adequately at a more adult level.
5. The tendency of offspring of exceptional parents to possess characteristics closer to those of the general population.
6. An unconscious defense mechanism by which there occurs a return to earlier patterns of adaptation.
7. The distribution of one random variable given particular values of other variables relevant to it (e.g., a formula for the distribution of weight as a function of height and chest circumference).
[L. re-gredior, pp. -gressus, to go back]

regression

1. A psychoanalytic term implying a return to childish or a more primitive form of behaviour or thought, as from a genital to an oral stage.
2. A psychological term denoting a temporary falling back to a less mature form of thinking in the process of learning how to manage new complexity. Cognitive psychologists view such regression as a normal part of mental development.
3. A statistical term defining the relationship two variables such that a change in one (the independent variable) is always associated with a change in the average value of the other (the dependent variable).

Regression

In psychology, a return to earlier, usually childish or infantile, patterns of thought or behavior.

regression

term open to misinterpretation, in that it means attenuation and subsequent resolution of symptoms or exacerbation of the disease state

re·gres·sion

(rĕ-gresh'ŭn)
1. Subsidence of symptoms.
2. Relapse; return of symptoms.
3. Any retrograde movement or action.
[L. re-gredior, pp. -gressus, to go back]

regression

1. return to a former or earlier state.
2. subsidence of clinical signs or of a disease process.
3. in biology, the tendency in successive generations toward the mean.
4. the relationship between pairs of random variables; the mean of one variable and its location is influenced by another variable.

regression analysis
see regression analysis.
regression coefficient
is the factor which determines the slope of a regression line; the greater the coefficient the steeper the line.
curvilinear regression
when the relationship between two variables is not linear.
linear regression
the relationship between two variables is a straight line.
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In this webinar series, we use straightforward, practical examples to illustrate some of the key characteristics in the evolution of regression modeling," comments Golovnya.
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The square of error values after summing up represent the total numerical error level associated with the predictions of the regression equation.
The dissertation [1, 2, 3] discusses the reliability estimation of individual regression predictions in the field of supervised learning.
Hynotherapists frequently take patients through age regression in their own lifetime to explore deep-seated fears and anxieties from childhood, and Anne says past life regression simply takes this process one step further.