In

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Related to regard: without regard

indium

 (In) [in´de-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 49, atomic weight 114.82. (See Appendix 6.)
indium 111 an artificial isotope of indium, having a half-life of 2.81 days and emitting gamma rays; it is used as a radioactive tracer in nuclear medicine.

In

Symbol for indium (preceding superscript number indicates an isotope); inulin.

IN

Intraepithelial neoplasia, see these.

In

1. Symbol for indium
2. Abbreviation for inulin
References in classic literature ?
CRITO: But you see, Socrates, that the opinion of the many must be regarded, for what is now happening shows that they can do the greatest evil to any one who has lost their good opinion.
Shall I return to your old argument about the opinions of men?--we were saying that some of them are to be regarded, and others not.
SOCRATES: The good are to be regarded, and not the bad?
With regard to supplies for the army, Napoleon decreed that all the troops in turn should enter Moscow a la maraude* to obtain provisions for themselves, so that the army might have its future provided for.
With regard to religion, Napoleon ordered the priests to be brought back and services to be again performed in the churches.
With regard to commerce and to provisioning the army, the following was placarded everywhere:
Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys; look upon them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death.
This discretion, in regard to criminal causes, is abridged by the express injunction of trial by jury in all such cases; but it is, of course, left at large in relation to civil causes, there being a total silence on this head.
The friends and adversaries of the plan of the convention, if they agree in nothing else, concur at least in the value they set upon the trial by jury; or if there is any difference between them it consists in this: the former regard it as a valuable safeguard to liberty; the latter represent it as the very palladium of free government.
It is evident that it can have no influence upon the legislature, in regard to the amount of taxes to be laid, to the objects upon which they are to be imposed, or to the rule by which they are to be apportioned.
To a certain written statement respecting not wishing to be regarded in a certain light.
And as to being regarded in lights, there's bumpey lights as well as bony.