refusal to treat

refusal to treat

A deliberate, conscious decision to withhold health care services from a patient.
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The facts demonstrated by these court documents, Bowler's connections to the entities involved, and her refusal to treat Gottesfeld with the same decency she willingly showed to terrorists, seem to bear out his claims about Bowler's lack of "ability to remain impartial.
The enactment of RA 10932, in the context of a public healthcare system that is deteriorating, unavoidably appears to be a stop-gap approach to curbing deaths and complications because of hospitals' refusal to treat patients in emergency situations.
In a similar context, the Administrative Prosecution also ordered investigations of an incident reported through a video that was also circulated on social media, where a father was protesting a hospital's refusal to treat his nine-month daughter in Ismailia, resulting in her death.
The ACLU filed a lawsuit in 2014 against the US Department of Defence over its refusal to treat Manning's gender dysphoria.
As a general rule healthcare practitioners in private practice or private hospitals are not obliged to treat people unless it is a medical emergency or the refusal to treat is unconstitutional.
Their refusal to treat ex-Army sergeant Jay Baldwin who lost his legs in an Afghanistan bomb blast is particularly gittish.
Dishonorable Disobedience'--Why Refusal to Treat in Reproductive Healthcare Is Not Conscientious Objection
The supreme court held that the superior court's refusal to treat tariff regulations as a form of economic obsolescence was not in error.
And for Israel its refusal to treat the Palestinians as equals with legitimate rights has destroyed the two-state solution and will trigger discussions about the future and nature of Israel itself.
The artist's blunt and unsophisticated diction epitomizes the lo-fi aesthetic that characterizes her work, a position that matches her refusal to treat history as a highly abstract and incorruptible discipline.
This "new Middle East," as it is called, is predicated on Israeli exceptionalism, using the phrase "existential threat" as a catch-all to excuse Israel's isolationist refusal to treat its neighbors as equals.
Refusal to treat patients with HIV was primarily associated with lack of ethical responsibility and fear related to cross- infection.