refracture


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re·frac·ture

(rē-frak'chūr),
Breaking a bone that has united after a previous fracture with the new fracture occurring at or near the previous fracture site.
[re- + fracture]

re·frac·ture

(rē-frak'shŭr)
Breaking a bone that has united after a previous fracture.

refracture

(rē-frăk′chūr) [L. refractus, broken off]
Rebreaking of a fracture united in a malaligned position.

refracture

the process of breaking a bone which has previously been fractured, but healed in an unsatisfactory manner, usually with a deformity.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, this kind of treatment is also followed by complications, mainly infections and dislocations, material damage, dislocation of prosthesis, and refractures.
In the department of children's trauma of Scientific Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics (Tashkent, Uzbekistan) during the period from 2002 to 2012 from the general number of the patients 136 children with refracture of the tubular bones were revealed.
Chart reviews of up to 4 years after the incident fracture found no evidence that ibuprofen delayed healing or increased rates of refracture.
A high degree of caution and patience was exercised during each surgical intervention and maintained for the full duration of the postoperative period because we were aware that our patient might have a tendency to poor healing and an increased risk of refracture, both of which are common in autosomal dominant OP.
Although the combination of intramedullary nailing and external fixation is technically more demanding than the LRS alone, it has the advantages of a reduction in the duration of external fixation, protection against refracture and earlier rehabilitation.
Complications of operative treatment of a proximal fifth metatarsal can include sural nerve injury, infection, refracture, nonunion, and potentially the need for subsequent surgical removal of hardware due to symptomatic hardware.
As the sharp edge of the garnet grain in worn away by friction and pressure build-up, the grains refracture and expose new cutting edges, prolonging disc life.
5) Although the current literature regarding refracture rates does not support either retention or removal of hardware, there appears to be no increased risk of fracture when hardware is retained.