refract


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Related to refract: Refraction of Light

refract

 [re-frakt´]
1. to cause to deviate.
2. to ascertain errors of ocular refraction.

re·fract

(rē-frakt'),
1. To change the direction of a ray of light.
2. To detect an error of refraction and to correct it by means of lenses.
[L. refringo, pp. -fractus, to break up]

refract

(rĭ-frăkt′)
tr.v. re·fracted, re·fracting, re·fracts
1. To deflect (light, for example) from a straight path by refraction.
2. Medicine To determine the refraction of (an eye, for example).

re·fract

(rē-frakt')
1. To change the direction of a ray of light.
2. To detect an error of refraction and to correct it by means of lenses.
[L. refringo, pp. -fractus, to break up]

refract 

1. To bend a ray of light when it passes through a surface separating media of different refractive indices.
2. To measure the refractive state of the eye.
References in periodicals archive ?
Refract are based in Newcastle and are disrupting the sales coaching and training industry with innovative products which I am bringing artificial intelligence to.
These sensors, combined with the phoropter head, are said to enable Eye Refract to automatically correct visual defects.
"Distance is what we're calling a survival racing game," explains Jordan Hemenway, developer at Refract. "It takes the intense action of arcade racing and places it in an explorable, atmospheric world.
He says that turning light into plasmons may be the only way to negatively refract a broad spectrum of visible light.
He said that the campaign had received "great news last month at a fitness to practise case, which ruled that an optician trained in refraction on a delegated functions course in the 1990s was indeed entitled to refract."
Huang said if they were oriented vertically in a pool of water, light striking the surface would refract negatively - bent in way that no natural material can manage.
The rainbow consists of drops of water in a cloud which refract the sunlight.
Sterile, crystal-clear, disposable reagent reservoirs refract light so graduations below the fluid surface become invisible, simplifying the filling of the reservoir to a desired volume.
His eye twitchily takes in places that semaphore colonialism (Trinidad and Tobago gained independence in 1962, three years before the artist's birth), and, later, he revives his apparently sharp memories of them in large-scale paintings that refract an ongoing mental fissuring.
'I'm fascinated by the work of artists like Turrell and Robert Irwin, who play on our perceptions of space and make people part of their work', says Duffy, 'and I want to bring some of that to our buildings.' Turrell designed a red, blue, and yellow LED system for the transparent chambers, and etched the glass with tiny dots to contain and refract the light.
The interior of the main entrance's conical structure is almost egg-shaped, allowing light to bounce between panes of glass and refract down to two levels below the street.
Born in Trinidad, she sculpts images from Arouca to Manhattan using the elements of a natural landscape that form the body of her poems and refract the sentiments of the poet, bending the light of each phrase to reveal the shadow moons that lay underneath.