refluxate

refluxate

(rē-flŭks′āt″)
The acid, gas, and liquid that rise from the upper gastrointestinal tract into the esophagus in gastroesophageal reflux disease. Its components may include gastric acids, bile, and pepsin.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The pH of NAR episodes may affect the biological activity of the refluxate content.
This suggests that gastric refluxate can enter the middle ear and thus contribute to the development of OME.
Vagal innervation is also the underlying mechanism for cardiac arrhythmia and ischemia being triggered by esophageal irritation with acidic refluxate, as well as esophageal spasm being triggered by cardiac ischemia (4,5).
The role of an alginate suspension on pepsin and bile acids - key aggressors in the gastric refluxate. Does this have implications for the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease?
In addition, decreasing transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) can reduce distal acid exposure and weakly acidic refluxate [6].
There were also no correlations found between pH levels and RSI 7 "Troublesome or annoying cough" or RSI 2 "Clearing your throat." Cough can not only be triggered by direct contact of the laryngeal mucosa with refluxate, as is the case with LPR, but GERD could cause indirect irritation to the larynx due to esophageal irritation caused by a vagal reflex [44].
"Aspiration of even a small amount of a neutral-pH refluxate causes cough," Koufman explains.
(2) LPR is linked to globus by two main mechanisms: (1) vagal reflux stimulation in the esophagus by acidic reflux and (2) mucosal injury in the larynx from direct contact with refluxate that contains gastric acid and pepsin.
(18) This transition usually occurs in the context of chronic gastrooesophageal reflux disease, which causes exposure of the epithelium to refluxate. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a major contributory factor and 5% of people with reflux disease develop Barrett's oesophagus.
While many people experience some degree of normal reflux of gastric acid contents, such episodes are generally considered "physiologic," as they are asymptomatic and the refluxate rapidly clears.
PPI therapy exclusively targets gastric acid production, but acid is not the only potentially harmful agent in the refluxate. An effective Stretta stops the reflux of all noxious refluxed material, including the potentially carcinogenic bile acids, while it obviates the potential side effects of PPIs.