reflux laryngitis


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reflux laryngitis

A chemical inflammation/acid reflux caused by pooling of regurgitated gastric secretions on the laryngeal mucosa, characterized by “…hoarseness, persistent nonproductive cough, a sensation of pressure in the throat and a continual need to clear the throat. The classic Sx of reflux, such as heartburn and regurgitation are often minimal or absent” Diagnosis ± Reflux, pH defects Management Omeprazole. See Acid-reflux disorders, GERD.

reflux laryngitis

Hoarseness, clearing of the throat, and alterations in voice quality thought to be due to injury to the posterior vocal folds by acid reflux.
Synonym: posterior laryngitis
See also: laryngitis
References in periodicals archive ?
Pilot study of the oral omeprazole test for reflux laryngitis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1997;116:41-6.
Chronic nonspecific laryngitis and reflux laryngitis were the commonest causes especially in males less than 9 years of age.
Standard dosages of proton pump inhibitors have been proven to be safe, but higher dosages may be needed to control symptoms in some cases of Barrett's esophagus or reflux laryngitis, a symptom of GERD, he noted.
In reflux laryngitis, stomach acid refluxes through this weak sphincter into the throat, allowing droplets of the irritating gastric acid to come in contact with the vocal folds, and even to be aspirated into the lungs.
NEW ORLEANS -- The proton pump inhibitor esomeprazole was no more effective than placebo in resolving signs and symptoms of suspected reflux laryngitis in a 16-week multicenter study.
Vaezi and his associates enrolled patients with suspected reflux laryngitis based on one or more of the following symptoms: throat clearing, cough, globus, sore throat, or hoarseness for more than 3 consecutive months, or a score of at least 5 on a laryngeal sign index based on a videostroboscopic evaluation of erythema and other laryngeal signs suggesting reflux etiology.
The following inclusion criteria were used: prospective RCTs published in the English language that compared a control group with a group of patients treated with a PPI who had a diagnosis of "laryngopharyngeal reflux," "reflux laryngitis" "laryngopharyngitis" or "reflux-associated laryngitis." Studies were not excluded on the basis of the definition of LPR, treatment regimen, or outcomes measures.
Sataloff, "Reflux Laryngitis and Other Related Disorders," in Sataloff, Professional Voice, 1-157.
Now, results from the first study of its kind have found that this same association is true for patients with reflux laryngitis, Dr.
Strobovideolaryngoscopy demonstrated bilateral vocal fold hemorrhages (figure 1), Reinke edema, reflux laryngitis, and a slightly raised mass in the middle one-third of the left vocal fold.
In some cases of chronic sinusitis, symptoms may be difficult to differentiate from those of reflux laryngitis. For example, both conditions cause a sensation of "post nasal drip," frequent throat clearing, halitosis, and chronic cough that is worse when lying down.
Additional indications include erosive esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, reflux laryngitis, or asthma exacerbated by acid reflux.