reflux episode

reflux episode

GI tract An episode of esophageal pH of < 4.0 for ≥ 5 secs, a parameter used to define gastroesophageal reflux disease. See GERD.
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The most important GERD symptom from the dental perspective is regurgitation, resulting in transportation of acidic gastric juices in the mouth following a reflux episode.
We theorized that while asleep, Caleb experienced a reflux episode that brought stomach contents into his throat, which, combined with the thick mucus and his already obstructed airway, led to complete blockage and respiratory arrest.
For those utilizing proper breath support techniques for public speaking and singing, abdominal pressures needed to project the voice can trigger a reflux episode.
This is the mean time from the beginning of the reflux episode to the moment when the pH returns to over 4, expressed as minutes.
Reflux events were measured by intraesophageal impedance (determining the height and duration of a reflux episode using electrical resistance).
The association between cough and reflux was judged positive if two criteria were met: a reflux episode preceded coughing by 5 minutes or less, which was called symptom index (SI) positive, and the symptom association probability was greater than 95%.
As a result, a reflux episode that occurs when gastric contents are at a pH >4 will not have a caustic effect on the esophagus.
But during 9 months of follow-up of 45 patients with supine GERD, 92 with upright GERD, and 88 with bipositional GERD, no differences developed in the percentage of time pH was below 4, the number of reflux episodes, the number of reflux episodes lasting longer than 5 minutes, the longest reflux episode, and Johnson-DeMeester scores (Arch.
Moreover, DeMeester scores, number of reflux episodes, number of long reflux episodes, and duration of episodes all decreased significantly within a 6-month follow-up.
When the investigators examined a combined measure of the number of reflux episodes and the change in DeMeester scores, they found normal reflux in 92% of the LINX group and 36% of the PPI group.
Onions, garlic, fried foods, chocolate, mint, and alcohol can also trigger reflux episodes, which can manifest as a burning sensation in the chest (heartburn), a sour taste in the mouth, difficulty swallowing, the feeling of having a lump in the throat, hoarseness, or a dry cough.