reflectance

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re·flec·tance

(rē-flek'tăns),
A measure of reflected acoustic energy as a function of impedance, as in the middle ear.

re·flec·tance

(rĕ-flek'tăns)
A measure of reflected acoustic energy as a function of immitance, as in middle ear impedance.

reflectance

(rē-flek′tăns)
The fraction of total light reflected after it hits a surface, and the angle at which it is reflected. It is the inverse of absorbance.

diffuse reflectance

The reflectance of light from a rough or nonpolished surface in which the radiant energy tends to scatter. The angle of reflectance does not equal the angle of incidence.

spectral reflectance

The reflectance of light from a polished surface in which the angle of reflectance equals the angle of incidence.

reflectance 

A measure of reflection equal to the ratio of reflected luminous flux Ε′ to the incident luminous flux Ε, i.e. ρ = Ε′/Ε. Syn. reflection factor. See Fresnel's formula.
References in periodicals archive ?
Where r is the reflection factor, then the portion of reflected energy is:
That is, the ratio of reflected energy corresponds to the square of the reflection factor.
Figure 2 shows the current wave shapes at different heights along the lightning channel whereby the ground reflection factor is set to 0.
On the other hand, the behaviour of the current peak versus the ground reflection changes at two different channel heights as illustrated in Figure 3 which shows the current peak has a direct relationship with the value of the ground reflection factor.
1 are in better agreement with the measured fields compared to other simulated fields while the peaks of the magnetic flux densities are directly dependent on the values of the ground reflection factor.
Moreover, it illustrates that the ground reflection factor has a direct relationship with the peak of d[E.
The effect of the observation point angle on the peak values of the electromagnetic fields are considered as shown in Figure 9 using a ground reflection factor of 0.
T] = reflection factor the tuner generates at the output port of the fixture
Figure 4 shows the output half of the test fixture power loss as a function of the tuner reflection factor, which shows the importance of the (reflective) loss contribution of the test fixture under high reflection factor conditions.
The use of of a programmable tuner capable of synthesizing arbitrary reflection factors offers a good solution to this problem.
It can be seen that the tuner can synthesize constant reflection factors within 0.
In every coefficient of utilization (CU) table, the first column of figures, for rooms with the highest reflection factors (RFs), have much higher values than the CUs in the last column for the darkest rooms.

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