reflection


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Related to reflection: Reflection of light

reflection

 [re-flek´shun]
1. a turning or bending back.
2. the folds produced when a membrane passes over the surface of an organ and then passes back to the body wall that it lines.
3. the turning back of a ray of light, sound, or heat when it strikes a surface it does not penetrate.
4. a communication skill in which a counselor or other professional reiterates either the content or the feeling message of the patient.

re·flec·tion

(rē-flek'shŭn),
1. The act of reflecting.
2. That which is reflected.
3. In psychotherapy, a technique in which a patient's statements are repeated, restated, or rephrased so that the patient will continue to explore and expound on emotionally significant content.
[L. reflexio, a bending back]

reflection

/re·flec·tion/ (-flek´shun)
1. a turning or bending back upon a course.
2. an image produced by reflection.
3. in physics, the turning back of a ray of light, sound, or heat when it strikes against a surface that it does not penetrate.
4. a special form of reentry in which an impulse crosses an area of diminished responsiveness to excite distal tissue then returns, retracing its path rather than traversing a circuit, to seesaw back and forth.

reflection

(rĭ-flĕk′shən)
n.
1. The act of reflecting or the state of being reflected.
2. Something, such as light, radiant heat, sound, or an image, that is reflected.
3. Anatomy
a. The folding of a membrane from the wall of a cavity over an organ and back to the wall.
b. The folds so made.

re·flec′tion·al adj.

reflection

[riflek′shən]
Etymology: L, reflectere, to bend back
1 a form of reentry in myocardial tissue in which, after encountering delay in one fiber, an impulse enters a parallel fiber and returns retrogradely to its source.
2 the return or reentry of ultrasound waves where there is a discontinuity in the characteristic acoustic impedance along the propagation path. The intensity of the reflection is related to the difference in the characteristic acoustic impedance across the interface.

re·flec·tion

(rĕ-flek'shŭn)
1. The act of reflecting.
2. That which is reflected.
3. psychotherapy A technique in which a patient's statements are repeated, restated, or rephrased so that the patient will continue to explore and expound on emotionally significant content.
[L. reflexio, a bending back]

reflection 

Return or bending of light by a surface such that it continues to travel in the same medium.
angle of reflection See angle of reflection.
diffuse reflection Reflection from a surface that is not polished and light is reflected in many or all directions (Fig. R4). Syn. irregular reflection. See diffusion; glossmeter; matt surface.
direct reflection See specular reflection.
reflection factor See reflectance.
irregular reflection See diffuse reflection.
law of reflection See law of reflection.
mixed reflection The simultaneous occurrence of diffuse and specular reflection.
regular reflection See specular reflection.
specular reflection Reflection from a polished surface in which there is no scattering and light travels back in a definite direction (Fig. R4). Syn. direct reflection; regular reflection. See specular microscope.
surface reflection Light reflected at a surface according to Fresnel's formula.
total reflection Reflection occurring when light is incident at an angle greater than the critical angle. Syn. total internal reflection. See reflecting prism.
total internal reflection See total reflection.
Fig. R4 A, specular reflection; the angle of incidence i is equal to the angle of reflection i ′. B, diffuse reflectionenlarge picture
Fig. R4 A, specular reflection; the angle of incidence i is equal to the angle of reflection i′. B, diffuse reflection

re·flec·tion

(rĕ-flek'shŭn)
1. The act of reflecting.
2. That which is reflected.
[L. reflexio, a bending back]

reflection,

n the act of elevating and folding back the mucoperiosteum, thereby exposing the underlying bone.
reflection, mucobuccal,

reflection

a turning or bending back, such as the folds produced when a membrane passes over the surface of an organ and then passes back to the body wall that it lines.

Patient discussion about reflection

Q. In what manner does bipolar reflect?

A. this is very difficult when you are not used to know the symptoms. such persons turn very fast and heavily from euphoric to depressive. the behaviour is then always excessive and sometimes not anymore under control. the risk to go in an asylum is acute.

Q. Hey Community ! i have been wondering ... in what ways does bipolar reflects? i suspect one of my friends is Bipolar and my fear is that i won't be for him at the moment he needs me the most because i won't know exactly how to " read " him straight as a bipolar ... is there like a predictable or kind of a mood guide i can use as a tool to what i have a described ?

A. i understand your concern, and it's very good to be aware about problems in your friends life! just remember that diagnosing bipolar disorder is not an easy thing to do- and it takes even a very good psychiatrist a few sessions. but here's a link for signs and symptoms of mood disorders that might give you a hint:
http://www.dbsalliance.org/site/PageServer?pagename=Signs_symptoms

Q. is cancer genetic? if one in the family has/had cancer does it reflects on the other family member's chances?

A. Unfortunately yes… some types of cancer have a clear genetic tendency, that means that if your mother had breast cancer- your chances to having it too is 10% bigger then anyone else. this is why if you know there’s a cancer tendency in your family, you should take even more care then others. Lower risks, get checked more often…that kind of things.

More discussions about reflection
References in periodicals archive ?
Reflection was found to improve students' self-awareness and self-confidence (Smith & Jack, 2005; Glaze, 2002).
The word reflection comes from the Latin word "reflectere," which means "to bend" or "to turn back.
Australia and New Zealand) and dentistry programs have been attributed to the assumption that critical reflection is difficult, if not impossible to teach and difficult to implement into traditional content-heavy curricula.
Many of the resources on reflection in education cite the work of John Dewey, whose educational philosophy included the principles that education should lead to personal growth, should contribute to humane conditions and should engage citizens with one another.
Each chapter concludes with an evaluation of the type of theological reflection presented, citing both its strengths and limitations.
Attachmate Reflection 2007 is the next-generation terminal emulator," said Eric Varness, vice president of marketing at Attachmate.
The final reflection asks them not only to discuss their learning, but to look ahead, toward their future literacy needs and paths.
This is the BRDF of constant value (having constant radiance in all directions) which describes the reflection properties of a diffuse surface.
TC Memo 2001-149, the Tax Court held that a corporate taxpayer could not rely on a specific dollar threshold as a basis for expensing capital items because the approach did not result in a clear reflection of income.
TELECOMWORLDWIRE-27 August 2001-WRQ introduces new version of Reflection suite (C)1994-2001 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.
Worldwide Computer Products News-27 August 2001-WRQ introduces new version of Reflection suite (C)1995-2001 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.
A perpendicular glass-air interface theoretically gives a back reflection of--14.