refer

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refer

(rĭ-fĕr′, rē-) [L. referre, to bring back]
1. To allude to or mention.
2. To direct attention to.
3. To recommend someone to another health care provider for specific testing or treatment.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Chavez has leveraged Merge eMed's offerings to optimize the system as a marketing tool, including quick, easy customization of the interface with West Coast's brand, and use of direct mail materials from the Referring Practice Portal Marketing Toolkit.
* They respect the provider's choice of physician, explaining the reasons why the patient may need to be seen by another physician, rather than the one requested by the referring provider
Even if the specialist could manage another small problem that the patient has--say, a problem of a different nature--the specialist should not provide this service without first obtaining the advice and consent of the referring physician.
One-quarter of the patients had undergone preliminary treatment with CC under the care of their referring obstetricians.
All three explanations make sense, and the mainstream belief appears to be that Caesar was referring to gambling.
While the hand off relationships would appear to be the simplest to manage, Geraghty and Lexington's Tucci recognize that a solicitor who is referring his or her own client can bring valuable knowledge of the client's financial affairs.
Innate: when referring to immunity, the local barriers to infection such as skin, stomach acid, mucous, enzymes in tears and saliva, etc.
In fact, ancient authors characterize vainglorious people by referring to cocks and cockfighting, and Erasmus has duly recorded this in the Adagia.
Even if your company doesn't have a formal reward system in place, referring someone who turns out to be a success can still pay off in the long run for you, especially if you're already a stellar performer.
Lastly, Salih Jawad Altoma, in a lecture at the Women's Club of the Pen Association in Washington, D.C., considered Nazik al-Mala'ika the most prominent poetess in the Arab World, referring to the rebellion, perplexity, and melancholy that saturated her poetry.
Those who complete the program are invited to the Teen Court office to destroy their referring affidavits and can resume their lives without a criminal record.
Referring to events from the New Testament's Book of Acts, he said, "Peter spoke with boldness, and their enemies noticed.