referral


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referral

 [re-fer´al]
in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as arrangement for services by another care provider or agency.

referral

Medspeak-UK
(1) A request made to a health or social care agency in the UK for assistance or a specific action. Under the Single Assessment Process, a referral would usually be sent with basic personal information and assessment information already gathered to trigger a specialist assessment. Individuals may self-refer or re-refer themselves as their care needs change.
 
(2) A request by a person, an organisation on behalf of a patient, or the patient him- or herself, to a healthcare professional or organisation to provide healthcare to one or more patients—e.g., a couple for infertility or for relationship counselling.

Types
Outpatient referral, A&E referral, AHP referral.

(3) A informal term referring to the date when a patient is referred in the UK by his or her GP to a qualified professional for in-depth assessment.
  
Medspeak-US
(1) A patient who has been sent (referred) for a second opinion or therapy to a specialist or subspecialist, because the patient has a disease or condition that the primary or referring physician cannot, or does not wish to, treat.
 
(2) The act of sending of a patient to another physician for ongoing management of a specific problem, with the expectation that the patient will continue seeing the original physician for co-ordination of total care.

(3) A formal process which authorises a health maintenance organisation (HMO) member to obtain care from a specialist or hospital; most HMOs require patients to get a referral from their primary care doctor before seeing a specialist.
 
Neurology
See Pain referral.

referral

Managed care A formal process that authorizes an HMO member to get care from a specialist or hospital; most HMOs require Pts to get a referral from their primary care doctor before seeing a specialist Medical practice
1. A Pt who has been sent–referred–for a 2nd opinion or therapy to a specialist or subspecialist with greater expertise, as the Pt has a disease or condition that the primary or referring physician cannot, or does not wish to, treat. See Second opinion.
2. The sending of a Pt to another physician for ongoing management of a specific problem, with the expectation that the Pt will continue seeing the original physician for coordination of total care. See Negligent referral, Self-referral. Cf Consultation.

re·fer·ral

(rĕ-fĕrăl)
Any health care services that are ordered or arranged.

re·fer·ral

(rĕ-fĕrăl)
Any health care services that are ordered or arranged.
References in periodicals archive ?
The three stages of the buying process that are the most critical to a loan officer's success in getting a referral partner's business are:
multiple referrals are offered so patient can choose the earliest available provider.
"We've heard from our customers that the Referral Program was one of their favorite reasons to tell their friends about Tesla, so today, we're introducing an all-new Referral Program to give customers another way to share what they love about their cars," Tesla said.
As a leading referral source to the self storage industry, Self Storage Referral connects customers to the right resources while supporting children's charities.
The legislation signed Friday by Cuomo amends Judiciary Law Section 498 by adding a subdivision providing that communications between a lawyer referral service and a consumer is deemed privileged on the same basis as communications between an attorney and client.
Evidence clearly suggests that antenatal care and skilled delivery alone may not have a significant impact on MMR.7 On the other hand, ensuring that all births take place at a health facility also does not guarantee that the MMR will be reduced.8 This is likely to be true for countries such as Pakistan where health facilities may not be well equipped or adequately staffed.9 Safe motherhood strategies clearly emphasise the need for timely referral by frontline maternity care providers and appropriate hospital care.8
Referral myth #3: Referrals will come with performance
The board, in preparing its amendments for referral rules, had rejected a recommendation from a special committee that lawyers be barred from using referral services that also provided referrals for callers for other professional services, such as medical care.
The most effective and readily convertible referral leads are those that "come from somebody who has credibility and authority, somebody who others will listen to and, usually, somebody who is successful," says Kuzmeski.