refect


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re·fect

(rē-fekt'),
To induce refection.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Stegeman, "Urinary CD4+ effector memory T cells refect renal disease activity in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis," Arthritis and Rheumatism, vol.
by employing higher-order polynomial interpolation schemes on the input signals to more accurately refect their slow-varying nature.
This may refect the multiple efforts made to improve early identification of risky alcohol consumption, especially in the primary healthcare system (Colom, Scafato, Segura, Gandin, & Struzzo, 2014; Keurhorst et al., 2013; Lopez-Pelayo et al., 2014).
A theory of species management, in this case focusing on non-native species, should refect the realities of the world, and this means the inherent risks of invasion must be taken into account.
Many of the reactions of Poles to the work of Jan Gross, starting with Neighbors, continuing with Fear and Golden Harvest, and up to the recent Polish president's (still pending) decision to withdraw from him the Order of Merit bestowed on Gross in 1996, refect such attempts to deflect rensponsibility for collboration with the Nazis and postwar acts of antisemitism.
A Duterte win, which pollsters say is likely, could see for the first time a serious move to change the Philippines Charter to refect a federal form of government.
The subdivisions of the bars refect the individual 6 hour runs; thus, for sections in the 24 hour bar.
Choosing the wrong pond: Social comparisons in negotiations that refect a self-serving bias.
But the purposes of our military power--which refect both enduring geopolitical realities and our most vital national interests and operating principles--remain remarkably constant.
The first is that the idea of either/or--being "born gay" or being born straight --is a modern invention, and does not refect reality.