redundant

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redundant

(rĭ-dŭn′dənt)
adj.
1. Exceeding what is necessary or natural; superfluous.
2. Genetics
a. Made up of identical repeating nucleotide sequences that do not code for genes. Used of DNA.
b. Relating to or being a gene that has multiple codons for the same amino acid.

re·dun′dant·ly adv.

redundant

(rĭ-dŭn′dĕnt) [L. redundare, to overflow]
More than necessary.
References in periodicals archive ?
The proof is that in the Ethiopian rite used for what we redundantly call the "responsorial psalm" (what other kind of psalm is there?
What this new edition's restorations make possible is a reconstruction that does not redundantly emphasize anything as mundane as Bigger's sex drive.
For greater reliability, processor modules are configured redundantly.
both colleges are members of the dfn association and redundantly connected to its network.
Overall control of the OB van equipment is performed via a redundantly designed Lawo VSM (Virtual Studio Manager).
Users can synchronize files between Turbo NAS and the Symform cloud easily for backing up important data redundantly in the cloud.
According to the company, euNetworks designed a bespoke, integrated private fibre and co-location solution, redundantly linking euNetworks' datacenter in Frankfurt, Germany with Dunkel's datacenter.
euNetworks will be delivering an integrated high power density, co-location facility for the hosting of AMS-IX photonic and Ethernet switches, which are then redundantly connected via 44 dedicated private fibre networks, to AMS-IX's distributed exchange locations in Amsterdam.
Border Collie required a managed storage service provider that could provide and implement a disaster-recovery plan and storage of its customers" video-surveillance content quickly, securely and redundantly.
This technology enables them to securely communicate and share information such as mutual-aid plans; it also allows members to safely and redundantly store other data (for example, employee contact information) that might be inaccessible during a catastrophe where IT operations are down.