reductionism

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reductionism

an erroneous belief that complex situations may be explained by reducing them to their component parts and explaining these.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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But atomism per se is not restricted to reductionistic varieties.
Even for clinicians who ostensibly use self-management support, reductionistic influences result in a disproportionate emphasis on strategies, such as medication adherence and exercise that targets body functions and structures (Packer, 2013).
Do you notice any reductionistic pressures from within yourselves or from the clinic or organization where you work?
Standing on this juxtaposition of Bultmann, Kase-mann, and Epictetus, Dunson then creatively contributes to the search for Paul's theology of "the individual." Dunson refuses the reductionistic tendencies of Bultmann and Kiisemann, and instead sets forth an eightfold psychological typology--or, a psychological taxonomy of individuals in Romans.
He argues that the current paradigm of neuroscience is too materialistic, deterministic, and reductionistic in viewing the human brain as a clockwork mechanism and merely physical causes and effects, and does not fully encompass the uniqueness of human beings.
Clinical checklists almost always prove reductionistic and
That is, the new spiritual guru movements (separate from old, "traditional" Hinduism) are by definition universalizing and reductionistic (and therefore no longer identifiably distinctive or uniquely Hindu).
Working with this assumption, methodologies and inquiries that try to explain religion in non-religious terms will be labeled as reductionistic and accused of missing that which makes the religious phenomena religious.
The central dogma of molecular biology and its reductionistic tenets invoked the genome as the ultimate level for understanding.
In all of the before mentioned disputes, the tensions between the search for a reductionistic (materialistic) framework in the life sciences on the one hand and for a metaphysical world outlook on the other were under intense consideration.
Conventional medicine's reductionistic viewpoint essentially believes we are "meat" machines with component body parts, whether they are tiny molecules like neurotransmitters, cells such as neurons, or anatomical structures like our spinal cords.
(5) We add to these criticisms: we will argue that premature, overreaching, and wildly reductionistic conclusions have been drawn, partly by ignoring major findings in contemporary brain research, and that highly important clinical implications have been overlooked.