reductionism

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reductionism

[riduk′shəniz′əm]
an approach that tries to explain a form of behavior or an event in terms of a specific category of phenomena, such as biological, psychological, or cultural, negating the possibility of an interrelation of causal phenomena.

reductionism

an erroneous belief that complex situations may be explained by reducing them to their component parts and explaining these.

reductionism(rē·dukˑ·sh·niˑ·zm),

n a tenet of the modern bioscientific approach to knowledge according to which anything complex can be explained primarily in terms of its simpler components.

reductionism

policy of reducing subjects to its parts in an attempt to simplfy the understanding of the whole. The opposite of holism.
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In a similar vein, meta theoretical counseling approaches such as feminist counseling theory (Enns, 1987), multicultural counseling theory (Cornelius-White, 2005; Ivey, 1995), and ecological counseling theory (Conyne & Cook, 2004; Cook, 2012), all disavow reductionistic, compartmental approaches to understanding the human condition.
This aside, Wright's final chapters do provide an insightful presentation of a reductionistic justification for the continued existence of religion (p.
Approximately 400 years since the emergence of reductionism as a scientific model, researchers are acknowledging that many mental health systems, which are organized on strictly rationalistic and reductionistic principles, are in crisis (Wiggins & Schwartz, 1999).
The implications of using both reductionistic and holistic approaches in acute care practice should be explored more fully.
The book hammers home, repeatedly, the important truth that any secular arrangement is historically contingent and subect to change and "contestation," but the reader quickly concludes that the author is more interested in the fact that contestation is occurring than in understanding why the "contestants" employ language that suggests their commitment to transcendent values and ideals, The fatal irony of the book is that the author is as reductionistic in her approach to religion as are the secular scholars whom she excoriates.
5) For these critics, then, "oppositional politics is reductionistic because it ignores audiences' less rational, nonpolitically motivated, and perhaps more creative readings of texts.
The problem is that this mirroring all too often weds the development of natural/holistic medicine to the reductionistic way of thinking that drives allopathic medicine and pharmaceutical development.
This report, surprisingly in JAMA, takes a less reductionistic perspective by hunting for the effects of diet from a more global perspective.
After very briefly acknowledging that 'unity of science' has had many meanings, Harding proceeds to discuss only a late logical empiricist version of the program that was both ontologically and epistemologically reductionistic.
This leads to reductionistic expectations of reading and writing that manifest themselves in pedagogical approaches and an over-reliance on assessment instruments like standardized tests.
Echo-Hawk's refusal to be captured by either the anthropologist's backward gaze or the art collector's reductionistic prowl for "authentic" Native art has some parallel to Pawnee color theory.