reductionism

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reductionism

[riduk′shəniz′əm]
an approach that tries to explain a form of behavior or an event in terms of a specific category of phenomena, such as biological, psychological, or cultural, negating the possibility of an interrelation of causal phenomena.

reductionism

an erroneous belief that complex situations may be explained by reducing them to their component parts and explaining these.

reductionism(rē·dukˑ·sh·niˑ·zm),

n a tenet of the modern bioscientific approach to knowledge according to which anything complex can be explained primarily in terms of its simpler components.

reductionism

policy of reducing subjects to its parts in an attempt to simplfy the understanding of the whole. The opposite of holism.
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It is precisely this blind spot that has unleashed so much social dislocation in the latter half of the twentieth century, as the reductionists of modern social science have destroyed the necessary structures of liberty in the name of liberation.
The authors never mention well-known Christian scholars who have developed robust models of personality based on enduring scriptural principles, many of which contradict psychology's reductionist views.
Due to some political positions and individual agenda, it is common for observers to view Islamism using reductionist lenses.
One might hope that whereas purely physical items subject the mereological reductionist to the dilemma of infinitely divisible magnitude, because tropes are mentality-involving they are not entirely physical, so they escape this dilemma.
However, no matter how Barthelemy reached his conclusions, it is difficult not to agree that a reductionist view that neatly ties up answers about questions in medieval society is doing an injustice to the period.
Do multidisciplinary pain clinics continue to relegate psychological pain treatment to second tier therapy once physiological reductionist treatments have proven inadequate?
In chapter 2, "Battle of Worldviews," Oziewicz examines reductionist and holistic criticism in practice in order to argue for holistic criticism as the superior approach.
In Chapter 1, 'Orienting Perspectives', Larson and Marsh begin by providing an overview of traditional reductionist approaches to literacy education.
The discovery of ring species such as the Larus gulls described above, (the Californian Ensatina salamanders or the Himalayan Greenish Warblers) challenges the reductionist notion of species.
Physics, it would seem, has been forced to move into new, less reductionist directions.
He concentrates on three main themes: disparities in incidence and mortality rates of cancer in different ethnic groups in relation to cultural beliefs, socio-economic status, and racism; cultural ideas about sickness and help-seeking behavior and their connection to wider views about suffering, misfortune, agency, responsibility, and autonomy; and the cultural issues of the popular turning away from biomedical reductionist approaches to cancer and towards complementary and alternative medicines.
Western science is based on a reductionist empirical account of knowledge in which we know with certainty only those things for which we have a particular kind of evidence.