reductionism

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reductionism

an erroneous belief that complex situations may be explained by reducing them to their component parts and explaining these.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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In the matter of chemical dependency, an overly reductionist approach--"addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disease"--cancels out the role of personal responsibility in a group of patients who particularly need encouragement for personal initiative.
The formulation of conceptually well-motivated alternatives to the Principal Principle--Hall's 1994 New Principle and Ismael's 2008 recommendation--seemed to provide the reductionist with the upper hand: the cost of moving to a new credence-chance principle was non-existent, or in any event negligible in view of the possibility of explaining the rationality of endorsing the favored credence-chance norm (thus apparently discharging or considerably diminishing the burden of the motivation problem).
Caiazza deftly exposes the unfulfilled promises and unexamined assumptions of each of the three reductionist programs.
The complexity of bullying is, however, reductionist in nature.
The idea that a person of faith is one who prays to a man with a long white beard is reductionist and undermines the arguments of a few prolific contemporary atheists.
Psychology's quest to be taken seriously as a science has included a reliance on empirical approaches to studying human behavior, a pervasive focus on the physiological factors of persons, and a reductionist view of personhood.
This is to say, prior to the twentieth century a thoroughly articulated reductionist or selective philosophy had not fully emerged, and hence neither had the need to articulate a comprehensive and holistic approach in similar terms.
This paper is presented in the current Australian reductionist context where educational policy is centered on measuring student learning and neglects issues of context and social outcomes (Lingard, 2001; 2012).
The Problem of Defining Islamism: Reductionist and Exclusionary Interpretations
Where does that leave the recalcitrant mereological reductionist?
And here I must address the one criticism that has dogged Girard throughout his career: it appears that his readings of these texts is "reductionist" that he finds imitative desire in every text he reads.