redintegration


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redintegration

 [red″in-tĕ-gra´shun]
1. the restoration or repair of a lost or damaged part.
2. a psychic process in which part of a complex stimulus provokes the complete reaction that was previously made only to the complex stimulus as a whole.
3. reintegration (def. 2).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

re·din·te·gra·tion

(rē'din-tĕ-grā'shŭn),
1. The restoration of lost or injured parts.
2. Restoration to health.
3. The recalling of a whole experience on the basis only of some item or portion of the original stimulus or circumstances of the experience.
[L. red-integro, pp. -atus, to make whole again, renew, fr. integer, untouched, entire]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

redintegration

(rĕd-ĭn′tĭ-grā′shən, rĭ-dĭn′-)
n. Psychology
Evocation of a particular state of mind resulting from the recurrence of one of the elements that made up the original experience.

red·in′te·gra′tive adj.
red·in′te·gra′tor n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

re·din·te·gra·tion

(rē'din-tĕ-grā'shŭn)
1. The restoration of lost or injured parts.
2. Restoration to health.
3. The recalling of a whole experience on the basis only of some item or portion of the original stimulus or circumstances of the experience.
[L. red-integro, pp. -atus, to make whole again, renew, fr. integer, untouched, entire]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

re·din·te·gra·tion

(rē'din-tĕ-grā'shŭn)
1. The restoration of lost or injured parts.
2. Restoration to health.
[L. red-integro, pp. -atus, to make whole again, renew, fr. integer, untouched, entire]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Both hypermnesia and inoculation effects presumably occur because repetition increases trace strength for recalled items, for example by 'redintegration', which is the refurbishing of traces due to feature activation (Brainerd & Ornstein, 1991; Brainerd & Reyna, 1990; Brainerd, Reyna, Howe & Kingma, 1990).
On the other hand, with sequential processing of verbal mediators, memory load during storage could be greater than with imagery, or redintegration of the sequential verbal mediator may take longer and be more susceptible to error than image redintegration during recall [21].